🎦 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King full movie HD download (Peter Jackson) - Drama, Action, Adventure, Fantasy. 🎬
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
Year:
2003
Country:
USA, New Zealand, Germany
Genre:
Drama, Action, Adventure, Fantasy
IMDB rating:
8.9
Director:
Peter Jackson
Noel Appleby as Everard Proudfoot
Sean Astin as Sam
David Aston as Gondorian Soldier 3
John Bach as Madril
Sean Bean as Boromir
Cate Blanchett as Galadriel
Orlando Bloom as Legolas
Billy Boyd as Pippin
Sadwyn Brophy as Eldarion
Marton Csokas as Celeborn
Richard Edge as Gondorian Soldier 1
Jason Fitch as Uruk 2
Storyline: While Frodo & Sam continue to approach Mount Doom to destroy the One Ring, unaware of the path Gollum is leading them, the former Fellowship aid Rohan & Gondor in a great battle in the Pelennor Fields, Minas Tirith and the Black Gates as Sauron wages his last war against Middle-Earth.
Type Resolution File Size Codec Bitrate Format
1080p 1920x1080 px 19109 Mb mpeg4 10151 Kbps mp4 Download
HQ DVD-rip 640x272 px 2090 Mb mpeg4 696 Kbps avi Download
Reviews
Pretty much outstanding
I admit it, I love all three Lord of the Rings films. People may say Return of the King is the best of the trilogy, some may say it is the worst. I personally think Two Towers is the best for its scope and better exploration of some of the characters, but while it is still great Return of the King is better than Fellowship of the Ring.

My only slight disappointment is the ending, it does feel overlong and bloated for me, almost as if there was more than one ending filmed. That said, what does make the ending at least watchable for me is the way it is shot, the marvellous score and the performance of Gollum.

Despite this minor discrepancy, Return of the King is extremely good and in my view one of the better Best Picture winners last decade. Peter Jackson's direction is very impressive here, and the scope is massive and just dazzling to watch. All three films of the trilogy are very well made, but Return of the King defines the term epic. The cinematography is mind-blowing, the scenery is superb, the costumes and make-up are well tailored, the effects are superb and don't distract too much and the lighting is authentic.

The score is phenomenal. Fellowship of the Ring had some ethereal, rousing, haunting and charming themes, whereas Two Towers was somewhat darker and more complex. Return of the King merges these together and the result is a perfect mixture of charm, darkness, etherality and complexity. The story is compelling with themes of friendship, strength and loyalty, the screenplay is well-written and literate and while the film is very long the three hours or so fly by seamlessly. The characters are engaging, Aragorn is even more interesting here than he is in the previous films while Gollum continues to steal every scene he appears in.

The acting is very good. Orlando Bloom(who I can find dashing yet uncharismatic and bland) and John Rhys-Davies are given less to do but do carry their parts very well, and Elijah Wood is likable enough. Sean Astin captures Sam perfectly and provides the heart of the picture, and Viggo Mortenssen is at his charismatic best here. Ian McKellen is perfectly cast, while the design of Gollum is still superb and Andy Serkis is equally phenomenal. I was slightly disappointed by the lack of any Sarauman, but I was more than I was satisfied with the final result.

All in all, an outstanding entry to a great trilogy. 10/10 Bethany Cox
2011-03-09
Five out of five decapitated orcs
This is the final movie in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, and certainly doesn't disappoint like some other trilogies *coughMatrixcough*. The three films had their principal shooting all done at the same time, which lowers their overall costs and keeps a good sense of continuity for the films.

The special effects, first of all, are excellent. While there's a few little things (a reversed shot with smoke flowing back into chimneys and occasional lighting that's a bit off), by and large they're excellent. The most impressive thing about them is the sheer scale. This isn't a small or simple scene; it often includes thousands of digital characters combined with filmed actors and action, sweeping landscapes, and dozens of things happening at once. This is a good reason to see it in theatres; even on DVD, there's little details that you can only catch when it's on a massive screen.

The filming is good, although there are a few evidences of digital smoothing and cutting that can nag at the mind and eyes of a picky movie-goer. There are a few interesting shots, but most are fairly plain and straight on, getting the point across without being dazzling. New Zealand's landscapes provide a great backdrop for everything going on, and there really are some beautiful places, especially up in the mountains. I hear land prices are quite good, what with the orcs warring and everything, so you may want to look into real estate purchases now.

Sound has been said to make 75% of the emotional impact of any production. This is a loud 75%. All the sound effects are very well pulled off, sound appropriate, and are generally loud. The Nazgul screeching was bordering on painful, but in a good way. Most everything has a distinct sound, and it's rare that anything feels out of place. In some of the battles, the roof of the theatre was shaking. The soundtrack fits the movie well, and Howard Shore has done an excellent job, as with the last two films in the series.

Performances all around were good, but Sean Astin as Sam and Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn really dominated the film. They performed their roles perfectly, and came away giving a good picture of the characters. Elijah Wood seemed to be stuck with the same terrified expression on his face through most of the movie, almost Max Payne-style, and it grew old quickly. Ian McKellen, the ever-wise white wizard, had a fair bit of dialogue which he delivered well; my only complaint is he had too much in the way of wistful sayings leading to scene changes. Orlando Bloom, favorite of young teenage girls everywhere, had a few more action sequences (which got cheers from the aforementioned girls) which were quite well pulled off, but his acting wasn't much tested by this film. John Rhys-Davies continued with Gimli's joking performance; he's really too amusing to take seriously, but does a good job at it.

For the old Tolkien fans, this movie stays quite close to the book, although they did have to omit some portions, most notably the taking and retaking of the Shire and the time spent in the Halls of Healing in Minas Tirith. Hopefully some of this will show up in the Extended Edition on DVD. Shelob's attack was left until this film, and much of the time spent in Mordor was shortened for the sake of pacing, and it was a good decision.

My favorite scene would have to be the battle at Minas Tirith. The incredible scope of the battle, with the special effects, sounds, and many close-ups of pieces of the action, make for an exciting scene. The visual effects especially are stunning; the 'oliphaunts' play a big part in the action, and they're entirely created by computer. There's also some wide shots with tens of thousands of digital characters marching on the field of battle, and even the individual actions have the masses warring as a backdrop. It's worth your movie-going dollar simply to watch this on a large screen. It was also intermingled with some smaller events inside Minas Tirith, so it's not pure battle for the whole of the scene, and it keeps it from being dreary or heavy-handed.

Overall, this is a movie well worth watching, and even paying to see in a theatre. I'd recommend against bringing small children, as there are some scary images, and they'd also be a distraction during the final movie in what will probably remain the series of the decade. Not a particularly great date movie, either...this is a real, bring-your-friends big movie. Five out of five decapitated orcs (and trust me, there were a lot more than that).
2003-12-20
My objective and unhyped view? Stunning. Simply stunning.
Frodo and Sam continue their quest to destroy the ring, led by the untrustworthy Gollum. Meanwhile the rest of the Fellowship prepare for another battle to hold a human city against an onslaught of orcs.

If you check my other reviews you will note that I wasn't a massive fan of the first two films - I loved them, but was not blind to their faults. However, let me just lay my cards out here, I was totally blown away by this film. For the vast majority (and more of that later) the narrative flowed really well where the other two films had struggled to really keep consistent. Here the various strands work well together and, while characters have only brief times to tell stories, on the whole it manages it well. I got the feeling that the film really let rip - it knew this was the ending and it did feel that everything came together in a collection of noise and energy which really made it feel like the final part of a trilogy rather than just a stand alone film.

The one area where the film really stutters (and actually caused people to leave the cinema in annoying numbers) is ironically the place where Jackson is true to the book, and that's the final 20 minutes. There is a clear scene where the film ends, however it then runs for another 20 minutes - which is a mix of scenes that all fade out like they were the end. To Joe Public (ie me!) I would have been happy not to have all the loose ends tied up in the way the book does it - the film should have ended on a high (with the King being crowned etc) but instead it seems to crawl to an end in a way that is not in line with the momentum of the film (if not the whole trilogy!) This problem is minor on the grand scheme of things, but I would rather have left the cinema on my high than be made to wonder `when's this ending? Is this the end now? Oh, maybe this is it now?' - but I do understand why it was done this way.

The cast, as they have been all the way, are excellent. Wood's Frodo changes well during this film while Astin is touching in his portrayal of unerring friendship. Bloom and Rhys-Davis had less to do but came into their own during the battle scenes - adding both action and the odd comic touch (`that still counts as one' being accepted by the audience as a chance to break the tension). Mortensen is the title character and serves it well, with McKellen also continuing his strong role. I could list through the whole cast but I will stick with noting two things. Firstly, both Monaghan and Boyd had bigger and more meaningful roles and rose to them well. Secondly I continue with my belief from the second film that Serkis is the stand out actor of the trilogy. His Gollum is so much more than an effect - he is tragic, fearsome, hateful and funny. Praise of course goes to the special effects for making this character tell so much with an expression but to pretend that the work of the actor is secondary to the character (as opposed the look) is foolish. He deserved one for Two Towers so I hope an Oscar goes his way. It was a shame to not have screen time for Lee but the film works well without him and it was a brave move by the editors.

The special effects do not stand out - and that's a compliment. Even in state of the art movies of late I have been aware that I could be watching a video game. Here I only occasionally noticed that things were clear computer effects, even though the majority of the film was! This is how they SHOULD be used - not as a draw in their own right but as part of the film. Whether it be the massive battle scenes that are spectacular or the animated spider or just the fact that I forget that Gollum is only an effect, I cannot fault it's use of effects or the sheer visual feast that is this film.

I have tried not to gush because there will be plenty of others to do that without me joining them, but it is hard to really fault this film. It is the strongest of the trilogy and brings it all together really well, it is an emotional event more than a film and, if Jackson needs 20 minutes of slow closure to finish it to his satisfaction then I can give him that in return for all the hours of wonderful cinema that he has given me.
2003-12-25
LOTR: CLASSIC, CLASSIC, CLASSIC
I knew it would be good, but this takes the entire cake. Peter Jackson has absolutely outdone himself with this masterpiece. True, there are a few tiny holes in the plot, but they are easily overlooked. Even if you're not a huge fan of Tolkien, you should really make an attempt to see this movie. I wasn't a fan of the books, but Jackson's movies have inspired me to pick them up and give them all a good read. Can't wait for the DVD. Let's see if Jackson does as good a job with The Hobbit.
2004-01-18
The greatest epic ever made
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is, hands down, among the most spectacular and magnificent films of all time.

A short run-down of the plot: After the battle of Helm's Deep and Saruman's imprisonment in his tower Orthanc, Aragorn, Legolas, Gimli and Gandalf re-group with Merry and Pippin in Isengard. There they learn that the army of Sauron is planning a full-scale attack on the largest city of men - Minas Tirith in Gondor. Gandalf and Pippin ride to Minas Tirith to warn Denethor, the steward of Gondor, of the threat from Mordor. Defenses are built up as the army of Sauron marches across the Pelennor Fields towards Minas Tirith. A distress call is sent to Rohan, still recovering from Helm's Deep. Rohan manage to muster a large army, and set out for Minas Tirith, but the battle has already begun. In the meantime, we continue with Sam and Frodo on their quest to destroy the One Ring.

A major achievement of this epic film is the character development. Gollum becomes more cunning and sneaky than ever, and manages to turn Frodo against Sam, who is desperately trying his best to get his old Frodo back. Merry and Pippin are no longer just a source of comic relief, both of them prove themselves worthy as they are split up for the final battle. We learn about the true bravery and potential of hobbits as Merry helps cut down the Witch King. Eowyn also proves herself in the film, as she defies her uncle and sets out to Pelennor fields with the other Rohirrim, and eventually destroys the Witch King, and makes a very feminist remark while doing so. We learn to loathe Denethor because of his hatred of his last remaining son, Faramir, who really hasn't done anything wrong. The peak of our hatred for Denethor is reached in the scene where he tells Faramir that he would have preferred it if he had died instead of Boromir, his brother. And then, right after that, Denethor sends Faramir into certain suicide, and Faramir immediately accepts the mission he is appointed to, in a final attempt to please his father. And of course, Aragorn learns to accept his fate as the true king of men.

In fact, the character development is so powerful that we actually participate in the character's feelings. We FEEL Frodo's exhaustion and agony as he literally drags himself across Mordor. We feel Sam's pain as Frodo is turned against him. And, just briefly, we participate in Gollum's triumph as he finally gets the One Ring. We are actually happy for Gollum and just for a brief moment, Frodo becomes the bad guy as he tries to take the ring back. All in all, Return of the King contains the most moving, emotional and touching scenes in the entire trilogy, and some of the best acting, especially from Sean Astin (Sam), Elijah Wood (Frodo), Ian McKellen (Gandalf), John Noble (Denethor, he is very successful in adding depth to his character), Miranda Otto (Eowyn), and of course, Andy Serkis (Smeagol, and top-notch at it, just like in The Two Towers).

The battle of Pelennor fields may be THE most spectacular and epic sequence in film history. Unlike Helm's Deep, Pelennor Fields shows the true cleverness of Sauron's army. Orcs are not the only participants; trolls are heavily used in the battle, as warriors and as beasts of burden. The nazgul are very significant in the battle, and while the Witch King didn't actually lead the battle as he did in the book, the nine ringwraiths and their fell beasts still play a key part and do lots of damage in the battle. We see just how powerful the nazgul really are. And of course, the men from the south and their massive oliphaunts play a significant part. While in Helm's Deep we felt triumphant, in Pelennor fields we only feel the triumph briefly, as the Rohirrim make their charge into the horde of orcs and trolls. The triumph in Pelennor Fields almost immediately dissolves, as the Rohirrim are trampled down by the oliphaunts. The battle is won, but we're not happy, we're grieved for all the destruction, all the losses. It's a totally different feeling than Helm's Deep, and makes this battle all the more superior.

Return of the King features the most magnificent visuals in the entire trilogy. Whether they are of Minas Tirith, Pelennor Fields and Osgiliath, Mordor and the slopes of Mt. Doom or the climb to Shelob's cave near Minas Morgul, Peter Jackson really shows us the true impact of these landscapes and images.

Many people may complain about the changes in the movie, especially the significant cut of Saruman from the end, but you must realize that if they would have featured the whole part with Saruman the movie would have continued another hour and a half. Don't fret; Peter Jackson said the scenes will all appear in the extended version of the film. The ending is long enough as it is, and the film continues at least another half an hour after the Ring is no more. The hobbits return to the shire, and Sam marries Rosie. Aragorn meets his fate and is crowned king, and is finally reunited with Arwen. And of course, one of the most moving scenes in the movie, in which Frodo gets on the last ship to the Undying lands with Bilbo, Gandalf, and the last of the elves (Galadriel and Elrond to name a few), and must part with his three hobbit friends for good.

All in all, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is one the most fine-tuned, cinematically perfect films ever made, it's absolutely flawless in every aspect. The Lord of the Rings trilogy as a whole is a spectacular achievement in film making history, and all three movies are together, without a doubt, the greatest epic ever made.
2005-10-27
The perfect ending for a great trilogy!
Wow, what a movie! It's not only the best of "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy, it also is one of the best movies of the past couple of years.

"The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" is a totally spectacular movie. It has some of the most amazing battle scene's in movie history. The word spectacular isn't good enough to describe it, it's breathtaking, epic and emotional involving. Who didn't wanted to pick up a sword and shield and charge with Aragorn towards a large number of Orcs for honor and glory?

Even though the special effects are far from the best ever, Peter Jackson is a master in mixing the special effect with real life action. The use of it never feels overdone and the result is spectacular as well as believable.

I think lot's of people were worried after "The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers" after seeing the battle of Helm's Deep. How was Peter Jackson ever going to top that great battle? Well, with "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" he topped it alright! The battle for Middle Earth is something you've never seen before. Greatest moment was when the riders of Rohan charged, it was really a moment in which you felt the true meaning of fighting and dying with honor. Also great moment during the immensely large battle were the fights against the oliphaunts, just when you thought the battle was over, those large creatures appeared! Really great moment.

The characters are possibly at their best in this movie. No characters need introductions anymore and we get to see the deepest of their emotions in this movie, even Gollum's!

Still the movie is not really deserving to be third in the top 250 here on IMDb.com. It's also not really deserving all those Oscar's it won. Like all The Lord of the Rings movies, it's great, spectacular and absolutely breathtaking at times but not classic masterpieces in my book.

Also the movie is far from flawless. Once again the editing is just poor at times and what was with the ending? Couldn't they just think of one ending? I expected the end credits to start rolling multiple times during the ending but it just went on and on.

Despite some of those flaws it still is an excellent movie with some unforgettable battle's sequence's. Truly a wonderful ending for one of the greatest movie trilogies in history.

10/10

http://bobafett1138.blogspot.com/
2005-04-30
Awesome following with amazing visuals and groundbreaking special effects
The third part in Jackson's trilogy based on the novels of J.R.R Tolkien, picking up shortly after the second one left off. This extraordinary film begins with Frodo(Elijah Wood), Sam(Sean Astin) along with Gollum/Smeagol(Andy Serkis) continuing the travel towards Mount Doom, the only place where the Ring can be destroyed. Frodo and Sam care the Ring in order to keep it from falling into the hands of its evil creator. Meantime Gondor is invaded by the Orcs of Mordor and Gandalf(Ian McKellen) and Pippin(Billy Boyd) ride to Minas Tirith. There rules Denethor(John Noble) and father of the deceased Boromir(Sean Bean) and Faramir(David Wenham). While Aragorn(Viggo Mortensen) must to chose among his two lovers, Eowyn(Miranda Otto) and Arwen(Liv Tyler). Aragorn along with Legolas(Orlando Jones), and Gimli(John Rhys Davies) travel to the creepy caves inhabited by the Army of the Dead.

This sensational epic adventure is plenty of action, impressive battles, spectacular drama and is pretty entertaining. Film packs a real sense of wonder and stimulating action set pieces illuminating the full-blown feats of the various protagonists and wind up an overlong battles and a stunning finale. Contains an incredible array of technical visual effects by Weta Digital and Weta Workship among other Cia. Sensational cinematography by Andrew Lesnie and spectacular and sensible musical score by Howard Shore, winning deserved Academy Award. Beautifully realized set design with phenomenal production values. The film provides enough amusement during the three and half hour and stays closer to the novel than any of the former adaptations-mostly animated and low budget- such as the mediocre effort by Ralph Baski. The motion picture will like to Tolkien followers as the neophite who didn't have seen the previous parts and those unfamiliar with the lengthy literary work. Magnificent direction by Peter Jackson bringing stunningly the imaginary world and mythology of Tolkien to life.
2008-01-10
Beautifully realized, but it has eight separate endings
***Spoilers herein***

That's right, this film could have ended eight separate times, but it chose to keep going. It's one of those movies where you think it's going to end, but then suddenly there's another scene. I would rather have had fewer and shorter Hobbit close-ups and Family Ties-style hugging, and more Saruman and Treebeard. The film skips Saruman's downfall, and he's relegated to a single sentence by Gandalf. After all the crap that Saruman pulled, I really wanted to see how broken he was after Isengard's destruction by the Ents. Speaking of Ents, Treebeard is in the film for about a minute. It would have been nice to see he and Gandalf gloating over Saruman's downfall. I guess there was only so much they could fit into three hours.

The three films are a tremendous effort. There are breathtaking vistas, panoramas, and sweeping pans whisking you up and down Minas Tirith and Mordor, and the battle scenes are nothing short of remarkable. In one scene, Legolas swings up the side of an oliphant and quickly kills everyone riding it, then fells the huge beast with a single arrow, all while the view is rapidly rotating around and around the maddened oliphant. It is a stunning special effect.

One problem I had with these films is the realism. In both Minas Tirith and Rohan, there are absolutely no farms, livestock, fields, wagons, crops, markets, trees, or any of the other things that a city requires in order to provide for its people. Watch the movie carefully. See a crop of corn anywhere, or even one single sheep? Where did they get the material for those clothes?

There are two scenes with Shelob that are breathtaking in their simple horror: there is a full view of Shelob, launching herself onto the little Hobbit with the tenacity of a rabid dog. In the theater, everyone gasped at that scene, because it drove home the size of Shelob against the size of Sam. The second one is where Frodo is by himself, on the path, and Shelob looms soundlessly over him. It is creepy to watch.

I'm disappointed by the truncated friendly rivalry between Legolas and Gimli. In the book there was a rich humor in their odd-couple friendship, but it isn't really explored in the films. Then again, there are so many characters that the film couldn't possibly explore them all. Eowyn's story seems particularly abrupt; the tender moment with her dying father is pretty much the last we see of her. I don't remember seeing her at the wedding. The moment she slays the Nazgul reminded me of St. George and the dragon. Also, Faramir's story ends abruptly too. And what about the white tree and the restorative quality of kingsfoil? It was those missing details that could have added more humanity to the film.

There could not have been a better Gandalf than Ian McKellen. He has just the right kind of wise, sprightly, smart-ass attitude that the character has in the book. He's fantastic during battle scenes, whirling around, running back and forth, telling people not to give up, conking mad steward Denethor on the head with his staff. I understand that Peter Jackson wants to make the Hobbit as well, and if so, it will be nice to see Ian McKellen introducing the dwarves one-by-one to Bilbo Baggins at Bag End.

Frodo and Sam's trek through Mordor moves too quickly. One moment they are in the orc's tower, and the next they are at Mount Doom. How did they get there so fast? Gollum's descent into the volcano was perfect. In a final demonstration of just how precious the ring really was to him, he keeps it out of the flame until the last possible moment as he slowly sinks into the lava, deliriously happy at having the ring again as he ignores the lava that eats him alive.

This film isn't perfect, but it's so faithful to the book and so carefully crafted that it's easy to overlook the faults and enjoy the breathtaking scenery.
2004-01-08
The first great cinematic masterpiece of the twenty-first century.
I am, I admit, an unlikely convert to the religion of Tolkienism. I have never read the books, having, I thought, been put off them for life by the sort of obsessive freaks who read them when I was at school. (One classmate, then aged about sixteen, told me with great pride that he had read the whole of 'The Lord of the Rings' at least fifty times). I also have never been a great admirer of the 'sword and sorcery' school of fantasy writing or film-making; indeed, some of this genre (mostly those starring the current governor of California) struck me as being among the worst films ever made. I was, however, persuaded to see the first in the trilogy, 'The Fellowship of the Ring', by its overwhelmingly positive reception from the critics, and was quickly won over by the scope of Peter Jackson's vision. I had been expecting some twee tale of elves, gnomes and fairies; what I experienced was a genuine epic (in the true sense of that overused word). Ever since December 2001, I have been waiting for parts two and three of the trilogy to be released. Neither has disappointed me. The story of 'The Lord of the Rings' is too complex to be told in a review such as this. Suffice it to say that it revolves around a magic ring which will give its possessor immense power. The power-hungry Dark Lord Sauron (a figure who is never actually seen on screen) desires to obtain the ring in order to dominate Middle Earth. His enemies, led by the wizard Gandalf, are seeking to destroy the ring, which can only be used for evil purposes, not for good. At the beginning of the final part of the trilogy, Sauron's forces are massing for an attack on the kingdom of Gondor. The film relates the story of the conflict which follows, and this leads to some of the most spectacular battle sequences I have seen, even more impressive than those in 'The Two Towers'. Inevitably, the film makes much use of computer-generated effects, but unlike many films dominated by special effects, plot and character are not neglected. The acting is uniformly good, and in some cases outstanding. Special mentions must also go to the camera-work, which made the best possible use of the magnificent New Zealand scenery, and to Howard Shore's memorable musical score. So, looking forward to the Oscar ceremony, I have no doubt that this should be the best film and that Peter Jackson, who has amply fulfilled the promise shown in the excellent 'Heavenly Creatures', should be best director. Best Actor? I would find it difficult to decide between the competing claims of Sir Ian McKellen, who brings wisdom, kindliness and the required touch of steel to his portrait of Gandalf, and of Elijah Wood, who plays the brave and resourceful hobbit Frodo to whom falls the dangerous task of ensuring the ring's destruction. Best Supporting Actor? My own nomination would be for Sean Astin, as Frodo's loyal companion Sam, but several others might have claims, notably Viggo Mortensen or Bernard Hill. Is this the best movie ever made, as some of its admirers have claimed? Possibly not- that is, after all, a very large claim to make. I have no doubt, however, that the trilogy as a whole is the first great cinematic masterpiece of the twenty-first century. It has certainly inspired me to start reading Tolkien's original novels. 10/10.
2004-02-04
The great film saga of our time.
The Lord of the Rings is without doubt the most epic and staggering film undertaking of all time. How Peter Jackson pulled it off I will never know, maybe he used one of Gandalf's enchantments! Rarely throughout the 12 hour epic is there a bad scene or a dull moment, every scene has had so much thought and hard work poured into it. From the writing, to the production crew, to the acting, to the scenery,to the music (oh god I love the music)and just everybody's determination to pull this near impossible feat off, even fantasy haters would have to admit their amazement. Never has a movie given me so many spine tingly moments and scenes of such beauty that they nearly push me to tears. Peter Jackson seemed so blessed with good fortune, (Viggo Mortensens' last minute replacement says it all), it was as if the spirit of Tolkien himself was guiding it along. As I see this as one whole movie, I won't be reviewing just 'The Return of the King'.

I saw the first film 'The Fellowhip of the Ring' when I was 12, and I'm 21 now and I still haven't been more absorbed by a movie in the cinema and I doubt I ever will. The transition from the innocence and lightness of the Shire at the start to the dark epic of the quest later is nothing short of brilliant. I think 'Fellowship' is my favourite of the three, it goes through the most development and felt the most satisfying. The whole mines of Moria sequence is my standout moment of the entire trilogy. To the battle with the cave troll and the escape from the balrog, it is exhilarating, involving and most of all - emotional.

'The Two Towers' has the hardest task of being the middle film, but it more than rises to the challenge. It drops you straight into the action and doesn't hold up. The Rohan sequences are the best bits of the film, culminating in the battle of helms deep which to me is the most personal and intense battle of the trilogy. The creation of Gollum was revolutionary, through CGI and motion capture never has a computerised character seemed so real.

'The Return of the King' delivers the emotional finale we all hoped it would. I remember sitting in the cinema hearing all sorts of sobbing all around me during the climax on mount doom. There are so many stand-out moments in this movie but the one I will mention is the charge of the Rohirrim. This scene actually pushed me to tears on first viewing, not because it was sad but because it was so... awesome. I was so happy when this film won 11 Oscars, it more than deserved it, I was hoping it would win more than 11 but oh well.

Any gripes I have for the trilogy, would be the portrayal of its big bad Sauron, and considering that Sauron is the centre of 'The Lord of the Rings' this is definitely a problem. If there was one thing from the books that is unfilmable it is definitely Sauron. How do you portray a villain that hardly appears and any descriptions of him there are, are so vague and surreal? Is Sauron a big flaming eye or did he have a physical form? This is never made clear in the books and poses a big obstacle for film, where the audience needs to see their villain. Peter Jackson and co do the best they can with the material, and chose to literally portray Sauron as the big flaming eye. However this is not enough to satisfy, especially during the climax of 'Return of the King' where the dark lord is basically a lighthouse! The films make the mistake of bigging Sauron up through the films, and ultimately it fizzles out by the end which is a real shame.

As you can tell from what I have said, I love 'The Lord of the Rings', and I would say it is my favourite film of all time. No other film has moved me as much as this and given me so many different emotions from fear, to sadness to laughter. I honestly couldn't imagine anyone else playing the characters, it was if they were made for them. The actors all generally had a special relationship with one another and with Peter Jackson (just watch the extras), and that what you are watching on screen is genuine. It was almost to the point that the actors weren't working so hard out of professionalism but out of love and devotion to Mr.Jackson. Hardly any other films can claim they had this kind of magic behind the camera. Honourable mentions will be given to Ian Mckellen as Gandalf, Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn and Elijah Wood as Frodo, I felt these three literally became the characters they were playing, but of course there are countless others to mention but I don't have time. Howard Shore's score is possibly the best movie score ever, and the films would be nothing without it.

Ultimately say what you will hardcore Tolkien fans about the films, you cannot deny that they did so much for Tolkiens' greatest work and made it one of the most recognisable stories in the world. If you have somehow not seen these films, first of all slap yourself and secondly go buy the extended editions as these are the true versions of the films and include many great scenes that were cut - especially 'The Return of the King' which had many vital scenes cut aka. Saruman's last hoorah and Gandalf confronting the Witch King. Peter Jackson I salute you, and New Zealand!
2010-06-21
📹 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King full movie HD download 2003 - Noel Appleby, Alexandra Astin, Sean Astin, David Aston, John Bach, Sean Bean, Cate Blanchett, Orlando Bloom, Billy Boyd, Sadwyn Brophy, Alistair Browning, Marton Csokas, Richard Edge, Jason Fitch, Bernard Hill - USA, New Zealand, Germany. 📀
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