🎦 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring full movie HD download (Peter Jackson) - Drama, Action, Adventure, Fantasy. 🎬
The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
Year:
2001
Country:
USA, New Zealand
Genre:
Drama, Action, Adventure, Fantasy
IMDB rating:
8.8
Director:
Peter Jackson
Alan Howard as The Ring
Noel Appleby as Everard Proudfoot
Sean Astin as Sam
Sala Baker as Sauron
Sean Bean as Boromir
Cate Blanchett as Galadriel
Orlando Bloom as Legolas
Billy Boyd as Pippin
Marton Csokas as Celeborn
Megan Edwards as Mrs. Proudfoot
Michael Elsworth as Gondorian Archivist
Mark Ferguson as Gil-Galad
Ian Holm as Bilbo
Christopher Lee as Saruman
Elijah Wood as Frodo Baggins
Storyline: An ancient Ring thought lost for centuries has been found, and through a strange twist in fate has been given to a small Hobbit named Frodo. When Gandalf discovers the Ring is in fact the One Ring of the Dark Lord Sauron, Frodo must make an epic quest to the Cracks of Doom in order to destroy it! However he does not go alone. He is joined by Gandalf, Legolas the elf, Gimli the Dwarf, Aragorn, Boromir and his three Hobbit friends Merry, Pippin and Samwise. Through mountains, snow, darkness, forests, rivers and plains, facing evil and danger at every corner the Fellowship of the Ring must go. Their quest to destroy the One Ring is the only hope for the end of the Dark Lords reign!
Type Resolution File Size Codec Bitrate Format
1080p 1920x1080 px 3790 Mb h264 2320 Kbps mkv Download
DVD-rip 480x234 px 792 Mb mpeg4 504 Kbps avi Download
iPhone 320x156 px 327 Mb h264 266 Kbps mp4 Download
Reviews
Richly deserving of its acclaim
Reading through the various posts, I see that the overriding theme amongst the movie's few detractors was that it was "overly long" and "boring", even prompting one poster to rename the movie "Bored of the Rings."

Well, these people clearly haven't read the books and thus are not Tolkien fans. J.R.R. Tokien's books are VERY long and descriptive, and even the hard core fan has to wade through certain elements. However, the books are thrilling, sweeping epics, microcosms of the age-old struggles between good and evil. In this context, Tolkien has created a complete alternate world, populated by humans and similarly-evolved races such as elves, dwarves and hobbits, and mixes courage, determination, love and magic to create "Middle Earth".

Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring accomplishes what no film maker dared attempt in the 47 years. It encapsulates the first book of the trilogy in jaw-dropping fashion onto film. And that bears repeating: the movie is so amazing, so awe-inspiring, so wondrous that through much of the movie, I felt my jaw literally dropping open. It's THAT good.

The cast is nearly perfect: Ian McKellan *is* perfect as Gandalf the Grey. The standoff at the Bridge of Khazad-Dum will go down with the alien's tail slowly encircling Lambert in "Alien", the initial emergence of the creature from the black lagoon and other horror/fantasy epic moments as one of the all-time great scenes in cinematic history. Viggo Mortensen, Sean Astin, Elijah Wood, Liv Tyler, Ian Holm, Cate Blanchett and the rest of the remarkable ensemble cast give the performances of their careers. The special effects, despite some that claim otherwise, leave the viewer on the edge of their seat throughout. And the good news is that since the movie has grossed over $800 million world-wide to date, the second and third installments of the trilogy will benefit with post-production special effects improvements.

If you haven't seen this movie, you've missed out, big time, unless you can find it still playing somewhere. The big screen is far and away the best place to view this masterpiece, especially sitting up close. I saw it three times in the theaters and would see it again today if it were playing nearby. And I know where I'll be the day "The Two Towers" is released: in my local theater, sitting close, watching yet another epic bit of storytelling unfold.

A gigantic 10 out of 10.
2002-06-23
I Almost Gave It A Nine (9)...
...but gave it a 10 because the stunning visuals (and I don't just mean "FX" I mean actual retinal intake at the utter aesthetic level) made up for the tiny bit of creeping out I got from looking directly into Elijah Wood's face all movie (not kidding). Short of that, I am almost excited and giddy such a new movie has climbed to #4 all time (on IMDb at least) but frankly it earned it. Any movie almost as good as Rain Man (but in polar-opposite ways) deserves to be #4...(I too loved Godfather and especially The Shawshank Redemption, but Rain Man is arguably the greatest film ever for many, vastly different reasons). I digress, no one should miss Lord of the Rings and I'm just glad I caught it at the Blue Ridge in Raleigh 8mos after it premiered (seeing this for the 1st time on video/at home would have been my loss).
2002-07-19
A sight to behold
Growing up, my dad would always tell me his favorite books were The Lord of the Rings volumes. But I was never interested in fantasies, so I didn't really care. Then I found out that Peter Jackman was making the movies so I told my dad. He became really excited. But still, I didn't care. Until one night in November, when they showed the LOTR special on TV. I was able to catch only the first ten, fifteen minutes and instantly, I wanted to see the movie. I had never read the books. My dad took me and my family to see the movie. I was a bit excited and curious to see how they would do it. Mind you, I knew next to nothing about this story.

I sat through the entire three hours in Middle Earth and fell in love with it. Through parts, I would clutch on my brother's arm, tense and hoping that everyone will make it through a lot of the sticky situations they were in. I fell in love with Legolas and his graceful Elf self. The minute the movie began, I was drawn in. The special effects were terrific. I felt like I was there. I wanted (and still do) to live in Rivendell among the Elves. The backdrops for the movies was fantastic. Sir Ian McKellan's quote about how New Zealand is Middle Earth is so true.

I was very impressed with the casting. I'm a huge movie buff so I have seen plenty of movies and I won't be lying when I say that LOTR has the best casting ever. Every person, the mains and the extras, WAS the character they played. The make-up was incredible. The orcs creeped me out. The Elves entranced me. The Hobbits brought a smile to my face. Elrond, Hugo Weaving, is the perfect Elf King, firm and commanding, yet with love for his people and respect for Frodo. I could go on and on, but I won't.

I loved the fact how PJ was able to make the Hobbits look small in every single scene. I would LOVE to know HOW in the world they did that. I love how the Elves are so graceful and look ethereal.

I know that the movie is three hours long and people balk at that. I took a friend of mine who hasn't seen the movie because it was three hours long. He loved it. He was engrossed and he had never read the book either. This movie is one of the, if not THE, finest piece of work I have seen. I eagerly await "The Two Towers" and "The Return of the King". I definitely recommend this movie for everyone to see at least once. I have seen it four times and will see it yet again soon. I can never get bored of this movie. Go. See it.

I leave you with a quote from Gandalf: "All we have to decide is what to do with the time that we are given"
2002-04-13
quite simply the best movie made to date
From the casting to the acting, from the cinematography to the special effects, from the locations to the sets and props an costumes and makeup, from the wonderful film score to the truly excellent screenplay, there is hardly a fault to find with this breathtaking, amazing piece of cinematographic art. Director Peter Jackson and his superb, highly motivated cast and crew have done the seemingly impossible in turning Tolkien's beloved books into a movie, and they have done it so amazingly well - finding their own idiosyncratic interpretations while staying absolutely true to the spirit of the book - that all I can say is: Go and see it!! - if you haven't done so yet.
2002-07-04
Amazing, breathtaking, brilliantly wonderful!!
This film is the most amazing journey I have ever been on. Not only was the movie enjoyable at the time, but I am holding my breath until the next one comes out! Although there are many characters in this film, it is made simple to follow and absolutley entertaining to watch. There is no lack in performance, particularly by Ian Holm (Bilbo Baggins), Orlando Bloom (Legolas), Viggo Mortensen (Aragorn), and Hugo Weaving (Elrond), oh yeah and Elijah Wood (Frodo Baggins) oh and also Cate Blanchett (Galadrial)..did I also mention Liv Tyler??? (Arwen). Look, the whole cast is just amazing, I really can't complain about lack of talent, and believe me, I'm picky. Don't go and see this movie if you are looking for just something short and funny. This is a deep movie which has great morals such as "Even the smallest person can change the course of the future", and will leave you pondering it for days afterwards and you may perhaps start reading the books! It is simply a dream...all the actors you could ever hope for under one roof! This movie is both magical, and suspensful. I recommend it to those who love fantasy and movies with lots of substance. This really is a journey you won't want to miss!
2002-07-06
An Amazing Achievement
'The Lord of the Rings' is one of my favorite books, I have read it several times, and remember thinking the last time, about 3 years ago that if I made a film I'd want to make it of this, but wouldn't it be almost impossible. You can then imagine how strong my expectations were when I went to see the eagerly awaited first installment.

This film impressed me hugely, more than anything else because of how true it was to my imagination, both in the characters as well as in the effects and setting- a sentiment I have heard consistently from other fans of the books. Elijah Wood brought across the character of Frodo with the kind of haunted, frail courage that Tolkien captures so well in the books. Nor could I find any fault at all with Ian McKellan's Gandalf, Viggo Mortensen's Aragorn, and Sean Bean's Boromir, all of whom I thought were portrayed excellently. I could pick out instances where I did think, 'no, that's not right', however their seldomness in number would only serve to illustrate the excellence of the overall portrayal. One thing that did stand out for me was Cate Blanchett's performance as Galadriel, the part itself became so perfunctory in the film that to me her alternation between benevolent seer, and figure of potential terror seemed little more than a slightly confusing detour with no real connection into the plot other than as a vehicle for a glimpse into the future. But that was it.

I thought that the points where Jackson did deviate from the text were completely the correct ones to do so. Shortening the opening Shire scenes and cutting out the whole Tom Bombadil bit was great since frankly they bored me slightly in the book anyway. Also, expanding the role of Arwen was a sensible decision.

However this film is by no means above criticism. The dialogue was in my opinion terrible and purely there to drive on the plot. Normally this would ruin a film for me (as in "The Matrix"), making it almost intolerable to view, however fortunately here it proves little more than a minor irritation. Also, the film seemed overall to be excessively plot-driven and at times a mad dash from one action scene to another, the characters, for all their truth to the book did seem flat and sometimes little more than stereotypical fantasy characters. This is perhaps my major quarrel with the film- I would have liked these characters to have come alive as people in a way that was made impossible by the sparseness of the script and the rollercoaster nature of the plot. In general the whole film lacked the depth of context that I think distinguishes Tolkien from other fantasy writers. However to have achieved this would have required a very different movie, and you can't fault an action film for being an action film.

This movie is undoubtedly not for everyone. A lot of people just don't get fantasy- other than Lord of the Rings, I don't particularly either. However in my opinion Jackson really has made an incredible achievement- his and Tolkien's vision carried through suberbly by a breathtaking setting and stunning special effects, as well as by a cast clearly as enthralled as he was. He has taken on a huge task, and is dealing with it with breathtaking success. Check for other user comments.
2003-04-13
epic filmmaking as it should be!
No I won't be silenced about this film! No, it hasn't quite reached obsession!

Alright. A quick plot summary, as if you don't already know. Bilbo Baggins (Ian Holm), having reached his 111th birthday decides to take off on a last adventure, like he used to in the old days. He leaves to his adopted nephew/heir, Frodo (Elijah Wood) his property and a mysterious ring, which Gandalf (Ian McKellen), the wizard bids Frodo to keep "secret and safe". Of course, as oft happens in these cases, the ring turns out to be the One ring, created by the dark lord Sauron, millennia ago, with the power to enslave the whole of middle earth. So it is that Frodo must leave his idyllic existence in the shire, with his friend Sam Gamgee (Sean Astin) and later superfluous hobbits Merry and Pippin and trek across middle earth to finally take the ring to be destroyed. Along the way, and after much peril, Frodo is joined by men Aragorn and Boromir, elf Legolas and Dwarf Gimli. So the fellowship of nine, in a nutshell, is formed.

What can one say? It's a film that I was waiting for a year and a half for. I was trying to ready myself for disappointment. And so, at 9:50am, Wednesday 26 December, during the first session of LOTR in Brisbane, Australia, I was to finally see this film, for which I had pined, ached to see for so long, and the result was... pure bliss!

So much had been riding on this film. And so brave it was to make all three at once, but it has paid off for the first instalment at least, and created such a marvellous cinema experience that I could hardly contain my excitement when I emerged from the cinema three and a half hours later, feeling rewarded for the experience as I noticed the huge line-up for the fourth session.

The opening of the film, not just the introduction but the whole Hobbiton sequence, was just perfect. It was so pure, so idyllic, so wonderful, rich. It was best we could hope for for the introduction into this world of hobbits, their tranquil, simple existence, which would be sharply and horribly contrasted with the sudden emergence of the evil bound to the ring. And from then on this sprawling epic took us on a journey rarely experienced by cinema audiences.

It is HUGE! It's on such a mammoth scale that you feel breathless watching these beautiful images, these sweeping crane shots, this massive view of a mythic world. Middle Earth is so convincing and not once did I think of it as a fantasy, more of a rich history. Surely we owe this to Tolkien but if it was not for Jackson's vision it could have emerged on-screen in a lesser and inferior form. Such imagination and vision, rich with detail, heart and genuine enthusiasm for the project is rarely found in a big film like this. Imagine what George Lucas would have done for instance. There would have been some annoyingly cute young hobbit characters and Gollum would have been more like Jar Jar Binks than a mysterious, shadow-dwelling enigma. `Mes-a Gollum!'? Shudder at the thought. It shows though that Jackson cares so much about the books, the characters, the story, that he does not sacrifice it for cheap grandiosity or easy commercialism. I actually cared about the characters, what happened to them, the struggles they had to face to achieve their seemingly impossible aim. And the film is not just a fantasy adventure with Jackson pointing here and there saying `look at this, see what I can do??', it works well as a beautifully-conceived, emotionally-rich drama. There are at least two very effecting, very real scenes, both toward the end of the film, in which you truly care and the actors show their craft. In these moments the audience would stop silent. Especially in the first session, there wasn't even a rustle, a crunch of popcorn or a breath to be heard as the struggle was shared by the audience. The performances are exceptional. Elijah Wood is wonderful as Frodo, evoking both youthful enthusiasm and great strength and resilience mixed with a sad loneliness and weakness. He is in one moment both determined and weary. Also worthy of note (and they all are, but being selective) are Sean Astin as Samwise Gamgee and Sean Bean as Boromir. Each brings to their role a painful honesty and true heart. Sam is one of the most admirable and delightful characters I have seen in ages. Sean is a long way removed from Encino Man here. And hopefully he will gain credit for this role, as he is truly excellent. Sean Bean is a man tortured by an underlying will to do good, but a strengthening urge to have power, corrupted by the evil of the ring. He is an excellent Boromir, who despite his transgressions is quite endearing at the same time. It's a given too that Ian McKellen is brilliant, and another Gandalf you could not imagine. Wise, bold, mischievous, caring. And Ian Holm as Bilbo is equally as good. Need I mention the superb art direction, costumes and eye-popping special effects. Particularly good is the way the differences in height from Hobbit, dwarf, man and elf are perceived.

And so, this film, so detailed, so beautiful, both subtle and thrilling, with some very tense moments, is instantly a classic and one of my favourite films of all time.

From one (potential) filmmaker to another, I can think of no better compliment to pay than to say, I wish I made this film. This is the type of film I would love to make. I wish I had some part, whatever it may be, no matter how tiny, in bringing this marvel to the screen. It pains me that I don't live in New Zealand and am still at university, because I would throw myself at Peter Jackson and say, `Take me, I will make you coffee!!' This is the effect of this film. So wonderful, so beautiful, so full of power and magic and bringing together a brilliant team of professionals who are all geniuses in their craft. A year and a half, so much waiting, so much anticipation and it was rewarded and here we have the first instalment of this trilogy, and we wait now for the other parts. It's hard to imagine a better adaptation or a better person to have brought this to our cinemas. Hardly surprising what score I gave it.
2002-08-04
A Glorious Vision of Middle Earth
The reason why this first part of Jackson's 'Lord of the Rings' is superior to his latter two parts is because of restraint. Jackson was restrained from over doing it with the CGI and "epic" battle sequences, which in my opinion does not make a story epic. Part of the reason was simply because Tolkien did not have very many battles in the first part of his book, which thankfully forced Jackson to focus on creating a believable world rather than a believable hack-n-slash action movie.

I don't find much entertainment in watching people mutilate each other, but I love it when a movie engages me in a world, and 'The Fellowship of the Ring' does just that. Certainly the most breathtaking scenes in the movie are the moments of patient observation, when the camera pans around and captures the beautiful settings of Middle Earth. I must give Jackson credit. He did hire some very extraordinary artists that have envisioned one of the grandest interpretations of Tolkien's world.

There are about five particular moments that stick out in my mind and gave me that tingle of goosebumps down my spine when I saw them for the first time. The first is the introduction to Hobbiton. After the somewhat awkward prologue, I was beginning to have my doubts to whether the movie would live up to the book. But the movie surprised me. Hobbiton is perfect. The houses have flower patches and old fences, the roads look worn and made through decades of travel, and the Old Mill spins with the laziness of a quiet town. Every color is vibrant and every moment looks as through it was taken out of a picture book. Although I still don't agree with the particular look of the Hobbits, I believe everything else in Hobbiton is worthy of Tolkien's words.

The second moment comes after Frodo's awakening in Rivendell, and the third, during the exploration of the Halls of Moria. In both moments, the camera pans away from the characters and outward into a static shot of their surroundings. The moments make us feel like we're turning our heads and gazing at the world around us just as the characters do. The golden waterfalls of the elven city mark an interesting contrast with the dark halls of the dwarfish mines, but each are inspiring in their own ways and add to feeling of being engaged in a living world.

My other favorite moments come during the exploration of Lothlorien and the passage down the Anduin. And while I won't go into detail about the scenes, since they really should be experienced without any prior expectations, they are monuments in imaginative cinema. 'The Fellowship of the Ring' is one of those rare movies that I always wish I could reexperience for the first time. Unfortunately, Jackson turned away from exploring Middle Earth in his next two movies, and instead, turned to fighting and warfare. He seems to take a lot of pride in the love story and battle sequences he created in 'The Two Towers' and 'The Return of the King,' but it is was in his first movie when he really got it right. In 'The Fellowship of the Ring,' it's okay if the characters are uninteresting and have silly dialogue. Middle Earth is the star, and the characters are the ones seeing it for the first time.
2004-04-11
surprising
well, "the lord of the rings" has always been my favourite book. when i first heard about the movie, i decided to boycott it. I mean, it's so annoying to not be the only one loving the novel anymore. for years i've tried to convince people to read the book and nobody wanted to/had the time to/was interessted in it. and just because there was some hollywood-blockbuster made, everybody around me has turned into a "lord of the rings-expert". so, can't change that anyway but didn't ever want to watch the movie because I thought there was no chance that anyone could ever bring the shire to live the way i've been imagining it. boy, was i wrong... some friends of mine "convinced" me to watch it (=told me they had tickets for "Le pacte de loupes" and waited for me to find out which movie we were actually watching) And, what can I say, I loved it. i totally lost myself in the beautiful landscape and the (let's not deny it) HOT actors. Although I should hate my friends for tricking me into watching it, i'm now a big fan of the movie myself.
2002-05-21
📹 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring full movie HD download 2001 - Alan Howard, Noel Appleby, Sean Astin, Sala Baker, Sean Bean, Cate Blanchett, Orlando Bloom, Billy Boyd, Marton Csokas, Megan Edwards, Michael Elsworth, Mark Ferguson, Ian Holm, Christopher Lee, Lawrence Makoare, Elijah Wood - USA, New Zealand. 📀
×