🎦 The Good, the Bad and the Ugly full movie HD download (Sergio Leone) - Action, Adventure, Western. 🎬
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Year:
1966
Country:
USA, Italy, Spain, West Germany
Genre:
Action, Adventure, Western
IMDB rating:
8.9
Director:
Sergio Leone
Eli Wallach as Tuco
Lee Van Cleef as Sentenza
Aldo Giuffrè as Alcoholic Union Captain
Luigi Pistilli as Father Pablo Ramirez
Enzo Petito as Storekeeper
Claudio Scarchilli as Mexican peon
John Bartha as Sheriff (as John Bartho)
Antonio Casale as Jackson / Bill Carson
Sandro Scarchilli as Mexican peon
Benito Stefanelli as Member of Angel Eyes' Gang
Angelo Novi as Monk
Storyline: Blondie (The Good) is a professional gunslinger who is out trying to earn a few dollars. Angel Eyes (The Bad) is a hit man who always commits to a task and sees it through, as long as he is paid to do so. And Tuco (The Ugly) is a wanted outlaw trying to take care of his own hide. Tuco and Blondie share a partnership together making money off Tuco's bounty, but when Blondie unties the partnership, Tuco tries to hunt down Blondie. When Blondie and Tuco come across a horse carriage loaded with dead bodies, they soon learn from the only survivor (Bill Carson) that he and a few other men have buried a stash of gold in a cemetery. Unfortunately Carson dies and Tuco only finds out the name of the cemetery, while Blondie finds out the name on the grave. Now the two must keep each other alive in order to find the gold. Angel Eyes (who had been looking for Bill Carson) discovers that Tuco and Blondie met with Carson and knows they know the location of the gold. All he needs is for the two to ...
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Reviews
Visual Literature
Sergio Leone is an underappreciated talent. His skill, in most cases, exceeds what he actually puts on the screen. This is, by far, his crowning achievement and the culmination of both his work and Clint Eastwood's career. After this, it is only pushing the plateau without success.

The primary focus of this movie is not the characters, the story winds up being the least of Leone's concerns. Instead, he is concerned about the camera and the music. Ennio Morricone, a genius in his own right, was seriously ignored by the Academy for his compilation here--certainly one of the Top 10 ever. He understands the crude editing of the mid-60s and exploits everything he can from the vision onscreen. If Leone was dissatisfied with the Ennio's final product, something MUST have been wrong with him.

The camera is another element that never lies. Modern filmmakers should study this before they try emulating MTV next time. With Leone's grandeur and a cast that understands that they aren't the real focus, how can he lose?

The story, while it isn't the greatest, is better delivered than such works as The Wild Bunch. Perhaps only High Noon understands the value of pacing and what to reveal/not reveal to the audience. Then again, Fred Zinnemann is an entirely different director. The character interaction here is certainly better than what Gary Cooper has to offer, not to mention the dialog includes some uncanny deliver by Eli Wallach.

Overall, a classic. This is a definer of the unconventional Western and visual literature. 4.5 out of 5 stars. A must see.
2003-08-10
Second best movie in Leone's superb spaghetti western "trilogy".
Most people choose 'The Good, The Bad and The Ugly' as the best of Sergio Leone's superb spaghetti western "trilogy" (I'm putting trilogy in inverted commas because the three movies actually have no connection to each other, and Clint Eastwood, despite the "Man With No Name" tag, plays a different character in each). Now it's a very close call I admit, but as much as I love this movie I'm inclined to choose the one before it 'For A Few Dollars More' as my favourite. Anyway, this is still a superb piece of pure entertainment, and Leone's movies had a massive impact on not just the western genre but action and adventure movies of all kinds. Clint Eastwood is super cool playing "Blondie" just as he was as Joe in the first movie and Monco in the second. FAFDM added a strong supporting character by Lee Van Cleef, TGTBATU continues that (though Van Cleef is playing a completely different guy) and also brings in Eli Wallach as Tuco, who adds some nice comic touches. Blondie and Tuco have lots of great scenes together, but I could have done with a lot more Angel Eyes (Van Cleef), one of the greatest screen villains of all time. Having three strong roles instead of just Eastwood is one of the great things about this movie. Another great thing is the unforgettable score by Morricone. Morricone did some of his most memorable work with Leone, and this could just be the best of the lot. Certainly the main theme (a massive hit single in the late 1960s as covered by Hugo Montenegro) is one of the most recognisable and original pieces of film music ever. Another standout is the spectacular bridge scene, surely a direct inspiration for Peckinpah's 'The Wild Bunch', a movie which owed Leone a sizable debt in my opinion. It's very difficult to pick this movie apart and single out what is so great about it as it really works as a whole. There's almost nothing wrong with it. It's one of the greatest westerns ever made and a hugely enjoyable movie that is just as compelling on your tenth viewing as your first. If you haven't seen it before I still think watching 'A Fistful Of Dollars' and 'For A Few Dollars More' first is the smartest movie, despite the three movies being a trilogy in name only, and each of the three being able to stand alone. Each movie is brilliant stuff and each comes with my highest recommendation. Movies don't get much more entertaining than this!
2003-07-20
film making of the highest order
The whole picture is superb, but the closing twenty minutes or so are simply breathtaking. From when the dust clears after the bridge blows, the movie develops a momentum that doesn't let up until the very last shot.

The dying soldier; Tuco being blasted from the horse and crashing into the gravestone; Tuco running round and round the graveyard (how was that shot?); the way the three protagonists come together; the shootout; Tuco and Blondie playing out their last confrontation; and then a final wail,the guitars come in one more time and Clint just rides hell for leather out across the desert.

It's cliché to say "they don't make 'em like they used to" but not only don't "they", "they" wouldn't have a clue how to make a movie like this any more.
1999-08-29
The best of the three and the best western ever.....
I spent all day watching all three movies and this one beats the other two and near every other western out there. (with a few exceptions...) Usually, Spaghetti westerns annoy me do to the cheesy noises, unrealistic shooting, and lots of bore. But this movie was different. Unlike the other two, this movie had lots of simple comedy. (Most from Eli Wallach's silliness and stupidity as Tuco adds a perfect sense of comic relief and Clint Eastwood's slickness and intelligence as Blondie makes him so.... cool. Lee Van Cleef does a perfect job as the villain giving a sinister performance. Instead of the fact that the slow parts in the first two movies were boring, this movie took advantage of long shots for suspense and to get a sense of things which is a great directing tool. (Kudos to Sergio Leone) I can surely see why this is #4 on the IMDb top 250. It feels more realistic than the other two movies. No whistling noises when things fall, suspenseful music(and very famous), stellar acting, and nice shoot outs. One of my favorite Clint Eastwood movies and one of my favorite westerns ever! A+. 10/10 Watch this one right away. (I recommend watching the new edition DVDs, the white cases, because the quality is better, the sound is great, and newer, and the dubbing is near impossible to spot.) Don't miss this or you will miss one of the greatest, classic movies ever made.
2007-09-08
Leone overcooks his spaghetti.
'The Good' is sharp-shooter Blondie (Clint Eastwood), although how someone who runs a bounty racket, betrays his friend, and shoots numerous people dead can be deemed good is beyond me. Bandit Tuco (Eli Wallach) is 'The Ugly', which I think is a little unfair to the bloke: he's no George Clooney, but he's not Quasimodo either. That leaves cold-hearted killer Angel Eyes (Lee Van Cleef) as 'The Bad', which he most definitely is, even going so far as to kill a child in order to achieve his goals. After Blondie and Tuco chance upon a dying Confederate soldier who reveals to them the whereabouts of a fortune in gold, the pair come to the attention of Angel Eyes, who will do anything to lay his hands on the treasure.

The Good, The Bad and The Ugly, the third film in Sergio Leone's Dollars trilogy, is an epic spaghetti western that benefits from iconic central characters, an undeniable sense of cool, and, of course, that classic Ennio Morricone soundtrack (Waaawawah, waa waa waa!). Where the film doesn't fare quite so well is in the pacing and storytelling, the basic plot—three guys go in search of hidden treasure—stretched painfully thin, particularly in the Extended Cut, which clocks in at approximately three hours. The expansive historical backdrop—the American Civil War—frequently detracts from the flow of the story and Leone has a tendency to labour a little too much over his style, lingering on his characters for an eternity and repeating similar shots ad nasueum, all of which causes scenes to drag. Fortunately, some nice touches of humour and a couple of neat plot twists help to make matters a little easier to digest.

6/10. Not quite as hard-going as Once Upon A Time In The West, but not a patch on the earlier Dollars movies, or indeed, Leone's underrated A Fistful of Dynamite.
2015-05-28
Wonderful
I must admit that I had some doubts prior to seeing this movie, considering its length and some people's comments that it is slow as molasses. Well, they were mostly right about that. GB & U is indeed a movie that does not always move very fast, and it does take a little getting used to. Yet if you manage to look past the slowness, this is easily one of the best movies ever made.

This is one of those movies where nearly everything comes together in exactly the right way. First of all, there is a wonderful cast of characters. Clint Eastwood is at his best as the 'Good' (even though he's not strictly a good guy but more a bad guy with an honor code), Lee van Cleef is so truly evil that you'll long for his downfall with a passion, and Eli Wallach steals the show as the 'Ugly', turning him into a character that you'll root for even though he's quite clearly the least trustworthy character you'll ever meet.

These wonderful characters engage in a quite complex plot full of twists and turns, as they are constantly trying to outwit and outshoot each other. There's quite a lot going on and in spite of the fact that the tone of the movie is actually fairly light (there is some truly good humor), it's actually a fairly good exploration of human nature and the lengths to which people will go to achieve their goals.

And then, there's the music of course. Ennio Morricone has always composed some very distinct and recognizable tunes, which unfortunately were not always that great by themselves. The music here, however, is absolutely one of the most memorable scores ever.

Of course, the cinematography is wonderful as well. The production values here seem to be a lot higher than in some previous Leone movies, and GB & U contains plenty of memorable shootouts that will truly keep you on the edge of your seat. At the same time, the gunmen here seem not nearly as invincible as in some other Leone movies, which greatly adds to the suspense.

As I said before, nearly everything comes together in this movie. Sure, it might be a bit slow, but it's got a great story of good versus evil, told in an impressive and truly epic way, with memorable characters and shootouts everywhere. Highly recommended
2007-12-25
not for me
I'm not a fan of westerns, but feel I've shoved myself in a sci fi horror orientated corner of ignorance so am slowly working my way through the IMDb top 250 in an attempt to broaden my horizons (and possibly catch that rare film that blows u away without expecting it) I did REALLY appreciate the level of accomplishment this film expressed. For its time the cinematic atmosphere of comedy, emotion and gritty drama was clearly above average for even now, and the acting skills were brilliant and really added personality.

however (and i don't think its cuz I'm a girl) this film just wasn't for me. it was very slowly paced and i didn't manage to follow or care much for the characters stories.

that said, i would definitely recommend watching it as its surely one of those films that depends heavily on personal tastes, and judging it as a western just doesn't give it the respect it warrants.
2011-03-22
The best cinematic meditation on greed since "Treasure of the Sierra Madre"...
Belfast-based comics writer Garth Ennis said it best: "There are two kinds of people in the world, my friend...those who dig Clint Eastwood movies...and dweebs." While I have to admit that my heart belongs to the opening act of "The Man With No Name" trilogy, "A Fistful of Dollars", there is no denial in my mind that "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" is actually the better film. Many directors have tried imitating it's style (including Don Siegel's substandard "Hang 'Em High" and Eastwood's own first Western offering as star/director in "High Plains Drifter"), but none have truly come close to the eccentricities on display here.

I have a suspicion that the storyline is actually based on historical fact. Consider this account from Joel Rose's "The Big Book of Thugs" under the entry of "The Reynolds Gang": They were organized in 1863 by Texans Jim and John Reynolds. They were briefly interned in a Civil War prison camp for Confederate sympathizers and after being released, began making robberies that, according to Jim Reynolds, were to help out Jefferson Davis and the Confederacy. The loot was buried somewhere in the area of Handcart Gulch and Spanish Peaks in Colarado Territory and later, after Jim Reynolds and four members of his gang had been executed by Colonel John M. Chivington of the Union Army, John Reynolds, dying from a fatal wound during a holdup, supposedly whispered out the location of his old gang's ill gotten loot. Unlike the movie version, it was never found.

Regardless of whether or not this was the actual basis for TGTBATU, it is nevertheless a film more grounded in history than a lot of it's comtemparies and, indeed, more than a few of it's successors. The Civil War is part of the backdrop, but it does so on a forgotten front of that war, the Western theater. Most high-school history classes would have us believe that nothing happened out West, but plenty did. In fact, the last skirmish of the war, if I'm not mistaken, was in New Mexico and, ironically enough, a Confederate victory.

The central of this film is greed. You don't just see it in the quest for the Confederate gold by Blondie, Angel Eyes, and Tuco. There are signs of it everywhere; in the hotel manager talking about how he'll be glad to get the Northerners in town for the money they'll bring in, Bill Carson appealing to Tuco's greed for a single sip of water, the gang of cutthroats who are systematically robbing the Confederate prisoners of their goods. Set up against the harsh desert backdrop, it exposes the ultimate folly of that greed (the best symbol of it perhaps being the cemetary where the gold is buried). A little over a decade before the Reagan era of "Greed is healthy, greed is good", this film provides the ultimate rebuttal to that argument. Greed has gotten just as many men killed, if not more, than patriotism ever did. Such a subtext makes "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" the cinematic child of John Huston's "Treasure of the Sierra Madre" and the precursor to Oliver Stone's "Wall Street".

As great as Leone, Eastwood, Van Cleef, and Wallach are, there is one member of this team that pushs this film into the status of greatness: score writer Ennio Morricone. Not only does he manage to write one of the most recognized theme tunes on the planet, he also adds the extra tension needed to convey the drama with the necessary oomph, the best examples being in Blondie's torturous walk across the desert, Tuco's frantic search through the cemetary (my personal favorite and so good that Lucasarts did a slowed-down version of it for their western shooter, "Outlaws"), and, of course, the final three way shoot-out. He still composes scores for many other films to this day, I've been told. A good example of his most recent work would be the 1990 version of "Hamlet" starring Mel Gibson and directed by Franco Zefferelli. But I truly doubt that he'll ever be able to top the legendary work he did here.
2000-08-26
"You may run the risks, my friend, but I do the cutting"
This week I was fortunate enough to see 'The Good, The Bad and the Ugly (1966)' (namely, the 2003 extended English-language version) in the cinema, perhaps the only place that Sergio Leone's classic Spaghetti Western can be properly appreciated. This was my second viewing – the first being in 2006, when my interest in cinema was still in its infancy – and, just as Leone's film gained status only in subsequent decades, my admiration has since grown substantially. By the early 1960s, the Western had become a tired genre, and even the best American entries {such as Ford's 'The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)'} could more closely be described as somber rather than thrilling. Leone's low-budget Italian productions breathed new life into the Western, the director's highly-stylised (and purely cinematic) film-making style tackling the recently-emerged Revisionist Western sub-genre with a cheekily-parodic sense of humour.

Though 'The Good, The Bad and the Ugly' clearly identifies each of its three protagonists with a titular adjective, the separating lines are decidedly blurred. Blondie (Clint Eastwood) is the archetypal anti-hero, a laconic, cigar-smoking bounty-hunter who makes every word, and every bullet, count. Tuco (Eli Wallach) is a slimy opportunist, a bottom-dweller whose unabashed enthusiasm – especially opposite the apathetic Eastwood – makes him an oddly-likable character. Angel Eyes (Lee Van Cleef) is a crafty, intelligent schemer, greed and contempt mixing behind those cold, steely eyes. Leon's film revolves almost exclusively around these three characters, and the American Civil War is utilised purely as a historical backdrop. As was the director's style, the film is a triumph of contrasts: an epic period of American history is used merely as a stage for an intimate battle-of-wills between three determined men with their own selfish aims.

Contrast, too, is evident through Leone's camera lens. Few directors (perhaps David Lean or Sergei Bondarchuk are his only true rivals in this field) have more inspiringly utilised the cinema screen as a canvas. Leone switches between landscapes and portraits, at times cutting unexpectedly from a distant long-shot to an extreme close-up of Eastwood's sweaty brow, his eyes narrowed and alert. I wrote in my review for 'A Fistful of Dollars (1964)' that that Leone's landscape was the human face. Unlike Ford, to whom setting was significant (one reason why he so adored Monument Valley), Leone's Westerns unfold in an anonymous landscape, dry and unremarkable and unforgiving. Colour is instead injected through Ennio Morricone's score, perhaps the most memorable ever composed for a film. The composer's contribution is uniquely cinematic, refusing to linger in the background and instead serving to overwhelm and enhance Leone's imagery.
2010-03-02
An incredible film
It is already a long time ago, I have seen this film for the first time. I think it was sometimes in the eighties. The impression was good but not excellent. But until now i have seen this film so many times!! And I must say, with every looking, this film gets better and better. I have also seen the two other films of the "Dollar"-trilogy and this film is the best by far. The sense of humor of this film is the key factor. Especially the performance of Eli Wallach is outstanding. For me the best actor ever. On the one side there are great actors (Eli Wallach, Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef) and on the other side there is a remarkable storyline. It's a story about three "criminals" who are playing some tricky games during the war between the South States and the North States. All in all its a very entertaining film with much suspense and great music! 10 points out of 10!!
2007-09-14
📹 The Good, the Bad and the Ugly full movie HD download 1966 - Eli Wallach, Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, Aldo Giuffrè, Luigi Pistilli, Rada Rassimov, Enzo Petito, Claudio Scarchilli, John Bartha, Livio Lorenzon, Antonio Casale, Sandro Scarchilli, Benito Stefanelli, Angelo Novi, Antonio Casas - USA, Italy, Spain, West Germany. 📀
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