🎦 The Good, the Bad and the Ugly full movie HD download (Sergio Leone) - Action, Adventure, Western. 🎬
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Year:
1966
Country:
USA, Italy, Spain, West Germany
Genre:
Action, Adventure, Western
IMDB rating:
8.9
Director:
Sergio Leone
Eli Wallach as Tuco
Lee Van Cleef as Sentenza
Aldo Giuffrè as Alcoholic Union Captain
Luigi Pistilli as Father Pablo Ramirez
Enzo Petito as Storekeeper
Claudio Scarchilli as Mexican peon
John Bartha as Sheriff (as John Bartho)
Antonio Casale as Jackson / Bill Carson
Sandro Scarchilli as Mexican peon
Benito Stefanelli as Member of Angel Eyes' Gang
Angelo Novi as Monk
Storyline: Blondie (The Good) is a professional gunslinger who is out trying to earn a few dollars. Angel Eyes (The Bad) is a hit man who always commits to a task and sees it through, as long as he is paid to do so. And Tuco (The Ugly) is a wanted outlaw trying to take care of his own hide. Tuco and Blondie share a partnership together making money off Tuco's bounty, but when Blondie unties the partnership, Tuco tries to hunt down Blondie. When Blondie and Tuco come across a horse carriage loaded with dead bodies, they soon learn from the only survivor (Bill Carson) that he and a few other men have buried a stash of gold in a cemetery. Unfortunately Carson dies and Tuco only finds out the name of the cemetery, while Blondie finds out the name on the grave. Now the two must keep each other alive in order to find the gold. Angel Eyes (who had been looking for Bill Carson) discovers that Tuco and Blondie met with Carson and knows they know the location of the gold. All he needs is for the two to ...
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Reviews
Perfect.
"The Good, The Bad and the Ugly" is the kind of film that needs to be seen by everyone. I'm going to make each one of my kids watch it when they get to be like 10 years old. It's a film that absolutely captures the essence of what life is all about. There really are only three types of people out there, and the three characters in this film are complete, yet simple, portraits of those three types.

The hairs on my arms stand up every time I watch this film, especially during the final scene. Sergio Leone knows how to build a scene. Ennio Morricone's music is absolutely perfect with this film. It's hard to think of a movie with a better soundtrack actually.

To summarize: brilliant, breathtaking, mesmerizing...and like a fine wine, this one just gets better and better. So far ahead of it's time, it blows your mind. "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" is one of the greatest movies ever made.

10 out of 10, kids.
2008-02-16
This is the reason why Leone is the greatest at what he does.
Before watching this movie, I have seen A Fistful of Dollars and For a Few Dollars more and I was quite impressed with both. However, after I have seen this, Leone instantly became one of my favorite directors. Leone has a distinct style in his films and this movie pulls it out 150%.

The cinematography in this film is incredible. His use of extreme long shots and extreme close ups are unsurpassed. The film opens with the close up of a man with an expressionless face creating a sense of mystery and excitement. What will this guy going to do? What's going to happen? Then we are introduced to two new unknown men and the three walk towards the entrance. Silence. Then suddenly, the 3 bust in, guns are shot and Tuco busts through the window and escapes with a half eaten chicken (or pork) leg. One of the men is injured, tries to make a futile final attempt to kill him and falls to the floor; the other 2 are already dead. Just in that one scene, we are introduced to Tuco and can already guess his character, his background info, and skill... without a single spoken line of dialogue.

As a matter of fact, nobody speaks until about 10 minutes into the film. It is all visual. We, the audience, are forced to imagine what the characters are thinking, what might be taking place. Leone gives the viewers a chance to guess what might happen. Even in Once Upon a Time in the West, we see his mastery at the No-Dialogue introduction. I also believe that this is his way to introduce the character's personality traits without the viewers actually knowing that they know it. A subtle technique so when they see a character do something later in the movie, the viewers can accept the character's actions.

However, Leone would not be as great as he is if it wasn't for his partner Ennio Morricone and his unique and memorable soundtrack. The coyote-like music sets the mood for this film like no other western. It is something you must listen to and experience it to retain the full appreciation of it, and know why it has become the trademark music for the western genre.

These techniques go on throughout the film and bring us to the ultimate scene in film history, where Leone's style shines to it's full extent. His incredible use of long shots to set the stage, close ups to catch the expressions, music to set the mood, montage to create the tension, expand it and finally when you are at the edge of you're seat, the scene goes off like lighting in the incredible climatic ending.

Leone is not just any director. He is one of the best, and THIS is his western!
2006-10-15
One of the greatest films ever made!
And Sergio Leone had to show Hollywood how a western should be done. Earthy, gritty, moody, rambling, funny and just plain nasty too. One thing most people forget about the Sergio Leone Dollar trilogy films is that they were made when westerns were really staid and boring, with zero atmosphere and very mechanical. Then came these movies, with THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY being the last and the greatest of the three Dollar films. Cinema wasn't the same after it was released. And to show influential this film is, it transcended its "western" genre and influenced practically every type of films made after that. Heck, I'm not even a western fan and I thoroughly admire what Leone and the gang created here. It's big, bold, melancholic, lusty, giddy and operatic.

The thing I really love about THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY is the atmosphere. It's almost one kind. Never duplicated in any other film since (and that includes Clint Eastwood's dry cowboy flicks). One major contributing factor is obviously Ennio Morricone's unforgettable score, probably one of the greatest scores ever made. The music during the ending, when Tuco searches the cemetery, it's spine tinglingly powerful.

Of the three characters, Tuco steals the show. He's the heart and soul of film. It's probably Eli Wallach's greatest performance. He immersed himself in the role and, in the processed, really became Tuco.

My only complaint about THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY is that it is a low budget film and as expansive and epic as it is, the film sorta looks cheap. Practically everything was shot outside. There are few sets in the movie and when we are within four walls, the sets look, hmm, cheap. I just wished the production design was as expansive looking as the vision Leone had in mind. The film would have been perfect then. But that's something I can clearly overlook.

When I watch a movie like THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY, I get depressed. Depressed because at one time films were actually amazing, groundbreaking and entertaining. The 1960s were one of the greatest era in movie-making. Sadly today's films don't even come close to the stunning creative output of that decade. They should re-release THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY on the big screen. It's a classic film.
2007-01-10
Visual Literature
Sergio Leone is an underappreciated talent. His skill, in most cases, exceeds what he actually puts on the screen. This is, by far, his crowning achievement and the culmination of both his work and Clint Eastwood's career. After this, it is only pushing the plateau without success.

The primary focus of this movie is not the characters, the story winds up being the least of Leone's concerns. Instead, he is concerned about the camera and the music. Ennio Morricone, a genius in his own right, was seriously ignored by the Academy for his compilation here--certainly one of the Top 10 ever. He understands the crude editing of the mid-60s and exploits everything he can from the vision onscreen. If Leone was dissatisfied with the Ennio's final product, something MUST have been wrong with him.

The camera is another element that never lies. Modern filmmakers should study this before they try emulating MTV next time. With Leone's grandeur and a cast that understands that they aren't the real focus, how can he lose?

The story, while it isn't the greatest, is better delivered than such works as The Wild Bunch. Perhaps only High Noon understands the value of pacing and what to reveal/not reveal to the audience. Then again, Fred Zinnemann is an entirely different director. The character interaction here is certainly better than what Gary Cooper has to offer, not to mention the dialog includes some uncanny deliver by Eli Wallach.

Overall, a classic. This is a definer of the unconventional Western and visual literature. 4.5 out of 5 stars. A must see.
2003-08-10
My review is superfluous...
... but i still want to jostle in with more than half of a thousand other reviews just to type: this is undoubtedly THE best Western movie ever and easily one of the best masterpieces of all time. Even the most noble adjectives preserved particularly for art praising found in Merriam- Webster are too mundane to captivate its greatness.

Please watch this classic before you die.

R.I.P Leone and thank you for blessing your fellow humans such a great gift.

P.S: Eli Wallach + Lee Van Cleef + Clint Eastwood = the most bad-ass narrow- eyes gang in Hollywood.
2010-07-17
The world is not black and white
Ok- first, as mentioned in another review, the geographic/historical errors in this film are GLARING. You've got men carrying revolvers that look like old style cap-and-ball pistols, but they're loading them with metallic cartridges- historically about five years early. Eastwood carries a rifle that hasn't been invented yet, Tuco assembles a "superpistol" out of a Colt, a Remington, and a Smith and Wesson- impossible. And there was nothing of merit taking place between the North and South during the Civil War in the Southwest. Now, that aside, I must say that this is the Greatest western ever. I first saw this film when I was about ten. I'd never sat through an entire Western befor, even though my Dad watched them constantly. Since then, I've been through film school, watched hundreds of Westerns, learned to appreciate them- but NOTHING matches up to this. The Searchers, Stagecoach, Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, The Gunfighter, High Noon, Shane- all great films, but saddled with the standard American Western morality- the good guy never takes liberties with the eastern schoolmarm, the bad guy wears a black hat, etc. Coming from Italy, TG,TB &TU isn't bound by these conventions. Blondie's the "good guy"- but he's also a bounty hunter. He makes a living in a highly immoral way, but is obviously the "good"- not because we're told, but from small acts- giving the dying soldier a cigar, making sure the Captain knows to hold on till he hears the bridge blow, the genuine regret he feel for having to let Shorty die. And while Angel Eyes may be the Bad, we at least know he has prinicpals- when he's hired for a job, he always sees the job through. And Tuco may be more immoral than the other two, but he's so savvy and his role so humorous that one can't bring oneself to look upon him disfavorably. In other words, historical inaccuracies aside, TG, TB, & TU maybe one of the most accurate portrayals of the West ever put on film- there are no clear-cut lines of conduct, no black and white, or even grey, but just a swirled palette of various facets of the human condition.
1999-05-28
The best cinematic meditation on greed since "Treasure of the Sierra Madre"...
Belfast-based comics writer Garth Ennis said it best: "There are two kinds of people in the world, my friend...those who dig Clint Eastwood movies...and dweebs." While I have to admit that my heart belongs to the opening act of "The Man With No Name" trilogy, "A Fistful of Dollars", there is no denial in my mind that "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" is actually the better film. Many directors have tried imitating it's style (including Don Siegel's substandard "Hang 'Em High" and Eastwood's own first Western offering as star/director in "High Plains Drifter"), but none have truly come close to the eccentricities on display here.

I have a suspicion that the storyline is actually based on historical fact. Consider this account from Joel Rose's "The Big Book of Thugs" under the entry of "The Reynolds Gang": They were organized in 1863 by Texans Jim and John Reynolds. They were briefly interned in a Civil War prison camp for Confederate sympathizers and after being released, began making robberies that, according to Jim Reynolds, were to help out Jefferson Davis and the Confederacy. The loot was buried somewhere in the area of Handcart Gulch and Spanish Peaks in Colarado Territory and later, after Jim Reynolds and four members of his gang had been executed by Colonel John M. Chivington of the Union Army, John Reynolds, dying from a fatal wound during a holdup, supposedly whispered out the location of his old gang's ill gotten loot. Unlike the movie version, it was never found.

Regardless of whether or not this was the actual basis for TGTBATU, it is nevertheless a film more grounded in history than a lot of it's comtemparies and, indeed, more than a few of it's successors. The Civil War is part of the backdrop, but it does so on a forgotten front of that war, the Western theater. Most high-school history classes would have us believe that nothing happened out West, but plenty did. In fact, the last skirmish of the war, if I'm not mistaken, was in New Mexico and, ironically enough, a Confederate victory.

The central of this film is greed. You don't just see it in the quest for the Confederate gold by Blondie, Angel Eyes, and Tuco. There are signs of it everywhere; in the hotel manager talking about how he'll be glad to get the Northerners in town for the money they'll bring in, Bill Carson appealing to Tuco's greed for a single sip of water, the gang of cutthroats who are systematically robbing the Confederate prisoners of their goods. Set up against the harsh desert backdrop, it exposes the ultimate folly of that greed (the best symbol of it perhaps being the cemetary where the gold is buried). A little over a decade before the Reagan era of "Greed is healthy, greed is good", this film provides the ultimate rebuttal to that argument. Greed has gotten just as many men killed, if not more, than patriotism ever did. Such a subtext makes "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" the cinematic child of John Huston's "Treasure of the Sierra Madre" and the precursor to Oliver Stone's "Wall Street".

As great as Leone, Eastwood, Van Cleef, and Wallach are, there is one member of this team that pushs this film into the status of greatness: score writer Ennio Morricone. Not only does he manage to write one of the most recognized theme tunes on the planet, he also adds the extra tension needed to convey the drama with the necessary oomph, the best examples being in Blondie's torturous walk across the desert, Tuco's frantic search through the cemetary (my personal favorite and so good that Lucasarts did a slowed-down version of it for their western shooter, "Outlaws"), and, of course, the final three way shoot-out. He still composes scores for many other films to this day, I've been told. A good example of his most recent work would be the 1990 version of "Hamlet" starring Mel Gibson and directed by Franco Zefferelli. But I truly doubt that he'll ever be able to top the legendary work he did here.
2000-08-26
They don't make 'em like this anymore.
This movie is a classic. It's spectacular, it's thrilling, it's beautiful. You won't find anything like this now-a-days, no matter how hard you try. Anyone who hasn't seen this movie should be ashamed of himself.

The plot is simple - Blondie (Clint Eastwood), the Good, Tuco (Eli Wallach), the Ugly, and Angel Eyes (Lee Van Cleef), the Bad, are all after a stash of Confederate gold, holding 200,000 dollars in gold, during the American Civil War. Seems like a pretty simple plot for 1 and a half hours, let alone 3. So what drives this movie? Style. Cinematography. Atmosphere. Let me explain.

The first scene in the movie is the (rather unappealing) face of a bandit. It then switches to a wide shot of the small town he and his two companions are entering. A few more shots of the bandits. They enter an inn, and gunshots are heard. Out the window comes charging Tuco, clutching a gun in one hand and meat in the other. The image freezes while he's in midair, and the writing "The Ugly" appears on the screen. The first half hour or so serves to introduce the three main characters in similar fashion. No plot progression whatsoever, merely introduction. Most movies would fall with a start like that, but not this one. It takes more than an hour before the rush for the gold begins, and by that hour you already know everything you can and need to know about the three anti-heroes: Blondie is the Good. He is not good at all under normal standards, as he is an outlaw, a killer and he betrays his "friend". But he seems good in comparison to the other slime-balls in the movie: Tuco is a villain, pure and simple. He steals, murderers, rapes, and does a bunch of other nasty things. But he is still fun and amusing, while the sinister Angel Eyes stands in comparison - a menacing figure in black clothing with an evil mustache, who kills and double-crosses without blinking for a few more dollars.

And the movie doesn't follow a plot. The plot is just a background for the amazing scenes that come one after another and construct the movie - you go from one scene to the other. And there are many memorable scenes in this movie: The first time Blondie shoots the rope before Tuco is hanged to death. Blondie's march through the desert. Tuco and Blondie's capture by the Yankees. Tuco's torture. Tuco's gunfight in the tub and the classic line that follows. The showdown in the deserted town. The bridge being blown up. Tuco's search for the grave. And of course, the amazing climax. But I'll get to that later.

We've covered the style, but I also mentioned cinematography and atmosphere. And the cinematography is amazing. Wide shots of towns and deserts zoom to close-ups of desperate and rugged men. The effect is amazing, especially during gunfights. It creates tension and suspense, and that leads me to the second point I mentioned: atmosphere. This feels like the West. The people look dirty and hard-working. The buildings look rickety. And when time is spent looking at each other before the guns are drawn for a few short seconds when the men fire at each other, you feel what it's like to be there.

And finally, as I mentioned before, the climax. Possibly the best climax in a movie ever. A Mexican Standoff between the three main characters in the film - Blondie, Angel Eyes and Tuco. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. Minutes pass as they stare at each other, each bringing their hand a bit closer to the gun. The music becomes more and more dramatic as time passes. You wait, and then... They fire, and it's over. A duel as a duel should be. It's mind-blowing.

Few movies can reach the level of this masterpiece. Fewer still can surpass it. They don't make 'em like this anymore, and it's a damn shame.
2006-01-19
The Good the Bad and the BEST
This is the closest thing to perfection, with pure great action, pure story telling and pure acting from visionary director Sergio Leone who has directed the two prequels to The Good The Bad and The Ugly, they are a fistful of Dollars and For a Few Dollars More. With Clint EastWood once again at the helm of the leading role delivers massive knockout performances as '' Blondie'' others in the supporting acting roles are Eli Wallach in the role of Tuco and the late Lee Van Cleef acting Angel Eyes. All of this though wouldn't have been possible without Sergio Leone, the man who set alight the Western frontier of films. Clint EastWood who has also been seen as one of the greatest Western actors of all time.

Nothing could be greater and more pure than to have a top of the world actor and a great visionary director. I just cant get over the acting from Clint and the breath taking action set pieces. In one sentence: Truly worth watching!!!
2007-04-22
The west as a piece of art...
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly has a very basic storyline - 3 cowboys trying to collect a fortune in gold. Sergio Leone then set this story against a backdrop of the American civil war. It is visually stunning, and has enough action for 10 films, let alone 1. Okay, so its not geographically or historically correct, but seriously, if you care about those things so much that you don't like the film, then you are just plain sad. The 3 main characters are excellent; Clint Eastwood as the laid back hero, Eli Wallach as his dirty Mexican partner and Lee van Cleef as the evil gunman who kills for a living. The whole film is like a work of art, leading up to the final gunfight in a stadium like cemetery, 1 of the best scenes in film history. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly isn't one of those films that is thought provoking, but it is one of the best simply because for 3 hours it is very entertaining, and a thing of beauty.
2007-02-28
📹 The Good, the Bad and the Ugly full movie HD download 1966 - Eli Wallach, Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, Aldo Giuffrè, Luigi Pistilli, Rada Rassimov, Enzo Petito, Claudio Scarchilli, John Bartha, Livio Lorenzon, Antonio Casale, Sandro Scarchilli, Benito Stefanelli, Angelo Novi, Antonio Casas - USA, Italy, Spain, West Germany. 📀
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