🎦 Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope full movie HD download (George Lucas) - Action, Adventure, Fantasy, Sci-Fi. 🎬
Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope
Year:
1977
Country:
USA
Genre:
Action, Adventure, Fantasy, Sci-Fi
IMDB rating:
8.7
Director:
George Lucas
Mark Hamill as Luke Skywalker
Harrison Ford as Han Solo
Carrie Fisher as Princess Lea
Peter Cushing as Governor Tarkin
Alec Guinness as Obi-Wan Kenobi
Kenny Baker as R2-D2
Peter Mayhew as Chewbacca
David Prowse as Darth Vader
James Earl Jones as Darth Vader
Phil Brown as Uncle Owen
Shelagh Fraser as Aunt Beru
Jack Purvis as Chief Jawa
Alex McCrindle as General Dodonna
Eddie Byrne as General Willard
Drewe Henley as Red Leader (as Drewe Hemley)
Storyline: The Imperial Forces, under orders from cruel Darth Vader, hold Princess Leia hostage in their efforts to quell the rebellion against the Galactic Empire. Luke Skywalker and Han Solo, captain of the Millennium Falcon, work together with the companionable droid duo R2-D2 and C-3PO to rescue the beautiful princess, help the Rebel Alliance and restore freedom and justice to the Galaxy.
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Reviews
Say what you will
Say what you will about this movie, its legions of fans, its prequels and sequels. No other set of movies is as well-liked by both "geek" and normal cinema lovers than Star Wars. People of all ages, race, and gender enjoy the movie, unlike many other cult-ish sci-fi movies (Star Trek anyone?) This movie has crossed all culture barriers, with characters, lines, and creatures all well known from one set of movies. You have to live under a rock to not know some of the story lines, statements and characters from this film. The funny thing is how some special effects from this movie look BETTER than some effects made in the 2000's (The Rock in Mummy Returns, anyone??) CGI, to someone like me, just can't compete with scale models, puppets, and camera tricks. I highly recommend this movie to the five people in the universe that have not seen it yet. 25 years later, and it is still, and will forever be, a classic. 10 of 10
2005-01-12
The Beginning of a Wonderful Trilogy of Films
Well, the only way to begin this review is to mention when I saw "Star Wars" for the very first time. I was merely a baby, from what I recall my parents telling me before their divorce. I wasn't even born when this first feature film hit theatres. I'm nineteen now, but I must admit that "Star Wars" was one of the many things that decorated my childhood. I always adored it, and always looked-up to Luke Skywalker. It was the type of view I can only assume all boys had; we all wanted to be a Luke Skywalker. We wanted to be the cool hero with a lightsaber. In this review, I will do my very best not to give you a biased review. However, forgive me, for I have always been a "Star Wars" fanatic. This was my first re-viewing in quite a while, so at least I'm reviewing the film with a clear set of eyes.

When two droids, C3-PO and R2-D2, escape the clutches of a shoot-out on a spaceship, they land on a desert-covered landscape, only to find themselves captured as slaves. They are reunited among the slavetraders, called Jawas. The Empire realizes that Princess Leia Organa had sent a message along with one of the droids who managed to escape the attack, so they begin to hunt for R2-D2 and C3-PO. Little does the Empire know that a young man, Luke Skywalker, and his uncle, Owen, had just purchased the two droids from the Jawas. While cleaning the two droids up, Luke stumbles upon the message Princess Leia had left for an "Obi-Wan Kenobi". Luke considers "Obi-Wan" a possible relative of a man named Ben Kenobi and goes on the look for him. For now, I will end my synopsis for the fact that I just described the first half-hour of the film. I want there to be more for you. All you need to know is that Luke is taken on a journey that changes his entire life and purpose, helping him make a transfer from a teen who longs to leave the ranch he is stuck living on to a man seeking the fall of the Empire. This film isn't just a film; it is a true adventure.

When it comes to the acting in "Star Wars", I truly don't believe it could get any better whatsoever. Mark Hamill was born to play Luke, Harrison Ford dominated his role as the swift Han Solo (a bounty hunter Luke ends up traveling with), Carrie Fisher is courageously independent as Princess Leia and doesn't fall into the shadows of her co-stars, but Alec Guinness was exceptional as Ben (or Obi-Wan) Kenobi. There is something magical and hopeful about the way Alec portrays Obi-Wan in this film. Also, Anthony Daniels is perfect as C3-PO! He may have been the simple comic relief, but I promise you he was the perfect choice for this character. I truly cannot see anyone ever playing this golden-plated character, who has practically become the symbol for any outsider who may have not seen the films. Without a doubt, the acting was exceptional in all respects. I believe the trickiest had to have been David Prowse, seeing as how Lucas ended-up not using Prowse's real voice for Darth Vader. With that thought, I must say that I enjoy James Earl Jones' voice much more for the character.

Anyways, moving along! The writing of each character was phenomenal. I feel that the banter was so well-done that it brings these characters to life even more, seeing the situations each of them are in within the duration of the film. "Star Wars" was also plotted very well, with all events and scenes not feeling out of place once.

The special effects, I must say, are top-notch, even if they have aged a bit in 2013 viewer's eyes. At some points, the effects look fantastic, while other scenes look like a "Star Wars" fan film from YouTube. That's common with classic cinema, so I don't mind it. I sincerely believe that people aren't the only ones to age.

This "Star Wars" film is definitely not my favorite, but it runs right behind "The Empire Strikes Back" and "Return of the Jedi", on my list. Overall, it is still very enjoyable with set designs that look like legitimate places amongst the galaxy. The detailing of the sets in this film are just shockingly realistic.

"Star Wars" deserves the eight stars that I have rated it. I like it, hold it as a memory in my heart, but find it to be an action-fantasy film, for the most part. It is brilliant, it is intelligent, and it is worth a try. I highly recommend the film.

May the force be with you all! God bless, and Merry Christmas!
2013-12-16
Excellent Excess
The very first note of John Williams's horn-blaring score as the film's title in thousand-foot-high block letters flashes on screen is the very moment when American film-making turned inexorably to big-budget, grand-themed audiovisual extravaganza strung together with simple stories, snappy catchphrases & cutesy jokes. But if George Lucas decided to follow Henry Ford rather than John Ford, he built a Shelby Cobra & left Pinto-making to his many, many imitators. Ironically, he himself remade one of the finest works of film master Akira Kurosawa, the Western-themed "Hidden Fortress," with one scene (the fight in the bar) lifted from "Yojimbo." As a result, "Star Wars" has a bit of the jittery discomfort of characters trying to fit into a story that wasn't quite made for them, like people with past life experiences that intrude into the present. Kurosawa's hero is split not into two but THREE heroes in "Star Wars" (four if you include the princess, who has a more prominent role in "Star Wars"). Hamill's Luke is often overshadowed by Kenobi (Guinness, whose skill had aged better than any fine wine) and Solo (Ford, in the role that deservedly made him a star), though he often holds his own as the clueless but determined farmboy-turned-hero. In less than five minutes, "Star Wars" sets the standard of outer-space audiovisual special effects that the industry was bound to follow from then on, forever sweeping away the earnest, toylike realism that Gerry Anderson was then giving us in "Space: 1999" in favor of exhausting but beautiful orgies of fast, violent, sweeping movement culminating in explosions of bright color & blaring sound. No wonder there's never any sex. "Star Wars" is science fiction only because it's set in outer space, by which standard "Dirty Harry" is a detective story & "Last Tango in Paris" a romance. Little attempt is made to explain the technological wonders depicted (we never find out why light sabers never have to be recharged or get even a cursory explanation of the Death Star). What little science there is can't be counted on, as when Solo extols the drag-racing abilities of the Millennium Falcon in parsecs, which are units of distance, not elapsed time. But Lucas never means to educate, only to entertain. Solo is a smuggler, not a science officer, while the others are not doctors or engineers but warriors, royalty or villains. Lucas's hammerhanded excess works because it never lets up & never goes for the cheap & easy. Though the heroes are unconvincing, "Star Wars" creates an array of badguys in the Galactic Empire that remain unsurpassed in cinema, headed by Darth Vader, who makes the Wicked Witch of the West look like Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle. In another irony, the most memorable scene in "Star Wars" is the motionless roundtable conference chaired by Tarkin (Cushing, in the greatest role of his long career) which yielded phrases long & gleefully repeated by a delighted America ("This station is now the ultimate power in the universe!" "This bickering is pointless!" "I find your lack of faith disturbing"). Perhaps, with the space program petering out & the hard realities of nuclear energy coming home to us, our fascination with scientific exploration was wearing thin. In the 1960s it enabled the cast of "Star Trek" to bring the writings of sci-fi geniuses to life with cardboard & aluminum foil. Never again. What better honor, or infamy if you like, could there be to "Star Wars" than that the "Star Trek" movies of the 1980s followed the simple themes, cuteness & spectacular effects of "Star Wars," turning their backs on their own heritage of awed exploration? Perhaps that first detractors and then supporters of Ronald Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative nicknamed it "Star Wars" so convincingly that the original name was quickly forgotten. The film might be a bit dated with its holistic, New Age mysticism (feel the force FLOWING through you!) which likely owes more to Jack Kerouac than Musashi Miyamoto & which became more difficult to depict with a straight face the farther the sequels & prequels went. Nevertheless, it was a worthy successor to the Code of the West, especially in contrasting Darth Vader with Luke & Kenobi. "Star Wars" can't really be judged by the standards of other films, partly because it reset the standards & partly because it became, most unusually, the fourth in a series of six! But there's no doubt that it's a heroic sensory extravaganza that will leave the viewer at once exhausted & exhilarated--and will do it over & over again, without offending, condescending or making one think too hard. If you just want to escape to a galaxy far, far away, jettison all skepticism, lower your shields & prepare to make the jump to hyperspace.
2006-04-22
Magical and unique experience
What else can there be said about this galactic masterpiece which has not already been said? Now in times where the saga is (hopefully) complete, "Star Wars" still stands out as one of the most important movies of the film history.

Even though some dialogs may be silly (but memorable nevertheless) and in spite of several logical mistakes, George Lucas' Science-Fiction-film can easily be considered as one of the most entertaining works ever. The spectator is introduced in a universe full of fantastic concepts and locations and meets there some archetypal characters, such as the beautiful and innocent princess, the keen, naive hero, the dark, evil villain, the wise, old man, etc. The mixture of fairy tale and western elements is extremely fascinating and seems almost perfect. Lucas' direction is so skillful that even the above mentioned drawbacks eventually appear as positive characteristics of this space odyssey.

No matter its meantime rather bad reputation, "Star Wars" is and will always remain one of the most magical cinematic experiences you can make. It is one of those movies you would like to talk about hours and hours, but which after all cannot be taken into words.

Rating: 96

MarSco
2005-05-19
Another experience I delayed far, far too long
George Lucas' Star Wars is a project unlike one I've seen before, as cliché and as empty as that statement might sound. It's a monumental achievement in the cinematic world, arguably the biggest one ever, that pioneered special effects work and accommodated for other science-fiction projects to follow in the next decades. When released in 1977, with sufficient hype and outstanding reviews, it was a movie-going experience; thousands of showings were sold out (something you never hear about anymore), universal audiences were captivated, cultists and enthusiasts were born, and the eye-popping technology was cherished and admired by many.

Watching Star Wars today (now called Star Wars: Episode IV: A New Hope with the release of the three prequels), there is still a uniquely affecting vibe that it sends with its compelling visuals and wonderfully articulated characters. It's over thirty years old, but it effectively holds the torch that makes it timeless. No matter how far technology progresses, and even with the onset of computer-animation and a heavy reliance on digital cinema, the look and beauty of Star Wars will likely never die out.

Since it appears that everyone has seen the Star Wars movies except for myself, I will spare you the boredom of hearing the plot reiterated for the umpteenth time. Besides, I'm not sure if I could explain it accurately. The film is fast-paced, dynamic, and just works so competently, that after a while, I began to dissolve any questions I had about the plot and just go along for the ride. Consistent readers know what I think of constant cinematic evaluations, and that I find them to often be without a reward and potentially lethal to the likability of a film. Things happen in Star Wars; crazy things, logical things, smart things, frightening things, but above all, enthralling things.

Speaking of enthralling things, I must admit how often I felt tension build and suspense become prevalent during the course of this film. For one thing, it's blatantly obvious to people who haven't even seen the series that these characters will make it (hence the two sequels). Yet, during several sequences, I found myself tense and extremely worried for these characters (most notably the scene in the trash chute). When a film can make you fear when you know the outcome is when you know true filmmaking tactics are at hand.

Something I have notice happen with older science-fiction films is that one of their downsides is their length due to their special effects showcase. Let me explain; Star Trek: The Motion Picture was a visual marvel when it first came out, but its story was extended out about twenty-five minutes longer than it needed to be because they were showcasing the technology, which was breathtaking at the time. It appears, too, that many fans even recall this fact with a bit of sourness, which is why when people refer to the "original trilogy" of the Star Trek films, they usually mean the second film through the fourth one. Star Wars doesn't bear that same quality; it doesn't need to turn the story into a methodical plod just to show off its creative design and visuals. It doesn't feel like a showcase. We get a perfect feel for the environment without having to stare at for an upwards of five minutes.

One thing that disheartens me greatly about this series is how controversial it has become. With numerous releases on DVD, and a new one on Blu-Ray, to my knowledge, the only original cuts of the Star Wars films you can see are on the Laserdisc/VHS versions. Because of this, fans have found themselves lambasting decisions made by Lucas, criticizing all the changes he has made to the series on the new releases of the DVDs, his re-releases of the movies in theaters, and lucrative branding/licensing of the figures in the money that, in 2013, continue to flood the store aisles of a Wal-Mart and Toys-R-Us near you. I believe that's one of the contributing reasons to why I never saw or even felt like seeing the original films until now; I felt alienated and bullied, with the series seemingly shoving itself down my throat.

On a final note, another impressive element is the charisma and talent of a young Mark Hamill, portraying no one else but Luke Skywalker. Hamill seems like the kind of guy who, after breaking out in Lucas' trilogy of films, would have gone on to do unprecedented projects, but alas, no. Hamill has only acted in either small roles or cameos in films, and hasn't really worked on any other mainstream picture aside from the Star Wars trilogy. While this fact is slightly depressing, as one can only imagine what he could've done, it's fortunate we weren't burdened of seeing him in anything atrocious.

Star Wars is, in short, an incorruptible masterpiece on film. A film that launched the genre of science fiction, propelling films about outer space to unheard of heights. It's just incredibly unfortunate to see what dismal treatment it, and its fans, have had to endure since its release.

Starring: Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, and Harrison Ford. Directed by: George Lucas.
2013-03-23
I'll tell you why this movie is so great...
I was four years old when I saw this movie and I remembered the whole thing, from beginning to end. It was summer and my family was spending a month at our camp. One day my sister (2 years old at the time) and I had been fighting all day. My parents sent us off to bed for a nap before dinner and I grudgingly complied. I was awoken by my father, he was asking me if I wanted to go see a movie. "It has spaceships, and robots, and lasers, you'll love it!" I looked at him through swollen eyes and asked, "does Jenna get to go to?" When I heard him say no, I knew I was in for a HUGE treat. We arrived at a nearly empty theater, and took our seats. When the first jarring chord of the theme hit me, and my father began reading the opening story, I was captivated. It was the happiest day of my life. To hell with all your nitpicking. When something makes that great an impression on a four year old, you know it has to be something truly special. By the way, I'm wearing the Boba Fett t-shirt my son's mother gave me as a gift. And no, I'm not some greasy, Star Wars obsessed dork. Well, not any more...
2005-04-08
George Lucas' mythological popcorn film is a two-hour roller-coaster ride that has passed into movie legend.
George Lucas spent four years developing and working on the galactic fantasy Star Wars. This was after he directed the dystopian science-fiction film THX 1138 (1971) and the rites-of-passage American Graffiti (1973). Star Wars was inspired by the Flash Gordon cartoon strip. It cost $8 million to make in Britain with three little-known Americans in the leading roles, supported by British actors. The story is a simple adventure yarn, and Lucas draws on samurai films, Westerns and every kind of myth, ancient and modern. The dogfights are based on a close study of World War II films. Star Wars was an immediate success. It became one of the great phenomena of cinematic history. It spawned two sequels, three prequels and endless imitators, creating a demand for spectacular blockbusters that has not yet ended. Industrial Light and Magic, the special effects unit that served the film, became a multi-billion dollar organization. Lucas himself also became and has remained one of Hollywood's most powerful figures. The film certainly struck a nerve in an America recovering from the humiliations of the Vietnam war. Ronald Reagan, elected president three years after Star Wars was made, spoke of the Soviet Union as 'the Evil Empire' and gave his proposed space-defense system the title Star Wars. The original Star Wars trilogy contributed to the worldwide renewal of the filmgoing habit, but in creating an appetite for child-like blockbusters that depend on special effects rather than on character and subtle narrative, the film unfortunately played a key role in what was to be called 'the dumbing down' of America and popular culture.
2010-10-05
Brilliant, entertaining space epic of good versus evil
This is an incredibly entertaining and well crafted space epic that has become a modern day legend and spawned several (for me, disappointing) sequels and prequels. This classic is a basic story of good versus evil, combined with a futuristic space setting and special effects. While it may be kind of fun to jokingly tell others 'May the force be with you', no one should seriously be getting their theology from it (as a few cult like followers seem to) since really, it's essentially a science fiction fairy tale.

As everyone must surely know, this original Star Wars tells the story of a handsome young farm boy and our hero, Luke Skywalker, who teams up with Han Solo, Chewbacca, a couple of 'droids' (C-P3O and R2-D2), and of course the grand master, Obi-Wan Kenobi to protect the galaxy from the villainous Darth Vader and save the beautiful Princess Leia from the clutches of the Evil Empire.

The movie became part of everyday life in the late 1970's and 1980's, and the phrase 'Evil Empire' so commonplace and universally understood that President Raegan used it to describe the Communist regime of the former Soviet Union. His proposed plans for defensive space weaponry even became known as the Star Wars missile defense program.

The actors are all perfect in their roles. Mark Hamill gives a charming boy next door heroism to the young Luke Skywalker, Harrison Ford a charismatic magnetism to Solo, Carrie Fisher a vulnerability, yet smart and feisty competence to the captive Princess, and Alec Guinness a mature wisdom to Kenobi. Of course the real stars of the show are C-P3O and R2-D2, an extremely lovable character who never actually speaks but simply pops and whistles. Each droid has a clearly defined personality and their interaction together is priceless.

It's a great story with wonderfully noble, courageous heroes and dark, dreadful villains. Wonderful special effects of course and star fighting action sequences. In fact, the problem for me with the later Star Wars movies is that, apart from developing the character of Darth Vader and revealing the origin of his wickedness, the other films are primarily effects, star fighting, and galactic bars. Short on plot for adults, in my opinion. I really enjoyed this original picture, but found the prequels and sequels boring to sit through. Also, the Star Wars movies do not have anything comparable to the character interaction present in the Star Trek TV series or films, which I much prefer to Star Wars, even this original episode.

However, George Lucas and his string of Star Wars pictures are a legend, and this first movie at least is a barrel of entertainment for both kids and adults.
2006-03-26
Unsurpassed
Without a doubt Star Wars is, for me, the best film ever made. From the opening scene of the film to the closing credits, Lucas's epic space saga had me riveted as a 7 year old child and still does today as a 35 year old. Star Wars is storytelling at it's greatest. Brilliant characters and amazing settings. Good versus evil, right versus wrong. For it's day, the special effects were unbelievably spectacular and totally groundbreaking. I could watch this film over and over again and never get bored and I do. This is a film that everyone should see at least once. Without the following 2 sequels and the 3 prequels that form the entire series, Star Wars can easily stand alone head and shoulders above any other film, ever made. Added to the other 5 episodes, a legendary tale is created. The one, the only Star Wars. A#1, cream of the crop, best of the best. **********/**********
2006-03-18
📹 Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope full movie HD download 1977 - Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Peter Cushing, Alec Guinness, Anthony Daniels, Kenny Baker, Peter Mayhew, David Prowse, James Earl Jones, Phil Brown, Shelagh Fraser, Jack Purvis, Alex McCrindle, Eddie Byrne, Drewe Henley - USA. 📀
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