🎦 Psycho full movie HD download (Alfred Hitchcock) - Thriller, Mystery, Horror. 🎬
Psycho
Year:
1960
Country:
USA
Genre:
Thriller, Mystery, Horror
IMDB rating:
8.6
Director:
Alfred Hitchcock
Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates
Vera Miles as Lila Crane
John Gavin as Sam Loomis
Martin Balsam as Milton Arbogast
John McIntire as Deputy Sheriff Al Chambers
Simon Oakland as Dr. Fred Richmond
Vaughn Taylor as George Lowery
Frank Albertson as Tom Cassidy
Lurene Tuttle as Mrs. Chambers
Patricia Hitchcock as Caroline
John Anderson as California Charlie
Mort Mills as Highway Patrol Officer
Storyline: Phoenix officeworker Marion Crane is fed up with the way life has treated her. She has to meet her lover Sam in lunch breaks and they cannot get married because Sam has to give most of his money away in alimony. One Friday Marion is trusted to bank $40,000 by her employer. Seeing the opportunity to take the money and start a new life, Marion leaves town and heads towards Sam's California store. Tired after the long drive and caught in a storm, she gets off the main highway and pulls into The Bates Motel. The motel is managed by a quiet young man called Norman who seems to be dominated by his mother.
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Reviews
Movie At The Crossroads Of Time
What can you say about a film that's been talked about to death? Just this: If you've never seen it, you owe it to yourself to do so, not because it's a way of paying homage to the one true master of modern film, but because it's so fun to watch.

Janet Leigh plays a bored office drone who decides to steal some loot from her boss's obnoxious client and parlay it into a new life with her all-too-distant boyfriend. All is going more or less according to plan until she stops in at the wrong motel, where she befriends a friendly if somewhat nerdy desk clerk only to find it causes problems with that clerk's possessive mother, who as her boy explains, "is not herself today." I'll say she isn't, and so would Leigh's Marion Crane, who maybe should have put up that "Do-Not-Disturb" sign before taking a shower.

You can feel the decade literally shifting out of '50s and into '60s with this one. Even the opening shot, where the camera looks over a Western U.S. city in the middle of the afternoon and zooms in on what looks exactly like the Texas School Book Depository overlooking Dealey Plaza. Norman Rockwell touches abound, like the decor of the motel, but look at what's going on around it. People dress well, they still wear fedoras and jackets, but in their tense conversations and hooded gazes you can feel the culture just ticking away like a time bomb waiting to explode.

Most especially, there's Anthony Perkins, who plays motel clerk Norman Bates in a very oddly naturalistic way, complete with facial tics and half-swallowed words, not the polished image one expected to see then. Just compare him with John Gavin, who plays Marion's boyfriend in the standard-actor-of-the-day way. Perkins manages to be so weirdly magnetizing, even in small moments like the way he stumbles on the word "falsity" or notes how creepy he finds dampness to be.

He shines in bigger scenes, too, like his tense chat with Martin Balsam's boorish but diligent private detective character, Arbogast, who along with Perkins and Leigh delivers a landmark performance. The way both actors play out the awkwardness in their conversation makes you literally sweat. Then again, you're always uneasy around Norman. You definitely feel wary of him right away, but you find yourself liking him, too, even when he's busy covering up "Mother's" misdeeds. Not since Bela Legosi played Dracula did you get a horror movie with such a compelling central figure.

If you are sampling the many other comments here, be sure to look up Merwyn Grote's. He makes an interesting, compelling case for how director Alfred Hitchcock used his television series as a template for "Psycho." Certainly "Psycho" looks more like early 1960s television than any of the more sumptuous fare Hitchcock had been bringing to screen at the time. Not only is it in black-and-white, not color, but the sets; a ramshackle motel, a mothbally old house, a couple of cheap looking bedrooms, a bathroom in a used-car dealership, are deliberately low class.

It's thrilling to see Hitchcock move so effectively outside his normal element, and move things along with such clinical detachment and low-key technical finesse. Thrilling, too, to realize this is one of his most accomplished products; made by a man who was experienced enough to know how the game was played, and daring enough still to break the rules; indeed, start a whole new ballgame.

Is it the best Hitchcock movie? It's definitely one of his best, right up there with "The 39 Steps" and "Strangers On A Train" and "Sabotage" and "Shadow Of A Doubt." He only once again came close to making as good a film, with "The Birds," while Janet Leigh and Anthony Perkins never escaped the greatness they helped create here. Poor John Gavin had to quit the biz entirely, and became an ambassador.

Often imitated, parodied, referenced, and analyzed to death, "Psycho" still isn't played out nearly 45 years after it came out. You owe it to yourself to pay a visit to the Bates Motel; Norman has a room ready.
2004-08-10
pure timeless brilliance, this is more than a classic horror film
This film will never be outdated. It's a perfect example of the art of shocking and disturbing an audience without ever having to resort to graphic violence and gore. Excellent atmosphere, superbly talented actors, and a brilliantly demented storyline -- those easily add up to an entertaining movie night no matter how many times you have watched it in the past. You know all the lines, you know the ending, but you're still pulled in from the first second to the end credits every single time. It's a rare film that accomplishes this with such a massive audience.

This film deserved better sequels and it definitely didn't deserve the terrible late 1990s remake, but the merit in this first installment actually helps all of those to hold up better than they otherwise would.

Absolutely timeless, and SO much more than just a classic! :)
2005-01-29
Astonishing!
At last! i had already seen the movie i had been dying to see. Psycho is probably one of the best horror movies that makes sense ( take note ). Anthony Perkins is great as the mama's boy Norman Bates with his ultimate freakish character and suspensful smile. This movie, although not as violent as i expected to be, is extraordinarily intense in a way that it produces a psychological effect on its viewers. Since the beginning, tension already builds up as the spine-chilling sound of strings being sawed off its neck. An absolute must-see ( if you dare ) 9/10
1999-12-26
Probably, the most terrific thriller made. A film that terrifies even 50 years after it's made.
Probably, the most terrific thriller made. A film that terrifies even 50 years after it's made.

To pigeonhole this as a thriller would be wrong as per me. It has a murder mystery, a psychological thriller, a huge amount of drama, and even a family backdrop. With all such elements, it would be wrong if I were to categorize this as merely a thriller. Yes, it is filled with thrills and for the 110 minutes of running time, there is hardly any dull moment.

I have seen this movie, a number of times before and each time it had a terrific impact. Also, I have always found something new, maybe a new frame, new shot or a new background sound. The discovery does not seem to stop. This I attribute to the many elements that are involved in this film.

From placing the camera, composing the shot, revealing the right emotion and making the audiences wait till the shocking aspect is revealed, Hitchcock is at his best in this film. This is indeed one of the more simpler stories he dealt. Yet, he made it so impact full that it continues to surprise audiences even today. Thanks to the music by Bernard Hermann, whose contribution to the film is very important. I cannot imagine this film without the music and I believe that it's because of the music, that the resonance was acquired.

If it's the shower scene that is most talked about in this film, I believe there are couple or more scenes that are under rated yet very impact full. Now, I do not want to reveal those and give away some details. I can simply say, I was terrified by the climax shot where the mother is shown, more than anything else.

The cast is perfect equally, Anthony Perkins does a wonderful job as Norman Bates. He is cold blooded and yet looks so deceptively humane as an extremely caring human. This film and "The Trial" are perhaps the most important films in his career.

It is the first psychological thriller of it's kind as I read in various other sites and perhaps it is also the most violent films made. Though the violence comes for less than 10 minutes, it haunts so brutally, as if it was there all through the film.

It's a definite 5/5 for one of the finest films of all time by one of the greatest directors.

http://braddugg.blogspot.in/
2014-05-04
Hitchcock and Herrmann
Robert Bloch wrote the original work, Joseph Stefano adapted it into a tight screenplay but it was Alfred Hitchcock with the extraordinary complicity of Bernard Herrmann who transformed this lurid tale into a classic, horror masterpiece. The score propels us into the moment before the moment arrives provoking the sort of anticipation that verges on the unbearable. The fact that the key scenes have become iconic film moments: copied, imitated, emulated and parodied, have not diminished its impact, not really. The anticipation, underlined by Herrmann's strings, creates a sort of craving for the moment to arrive. That doesn't happen very often. No amount of planning can produce it or re-produce it - otherwise how do you explain the Gus Van Sant version - so, the only possible explanation is an accident, a miraculous film accident and those do happen. Everything falls into place so perfectly that even the things that one may argue are below the smart standard of the film, are needed, the film without every frame is not quite the film. Try to turn away after the climax during Simon Oakland's long explanation. You can't. I couldn't. Partly because you know you'll soon be confronting those eyes, that fly, the car...
2007-11-23
Cleaning Up After Mom
During the Mid Eighties I attended a science fiction convention in Manhattan and the feature attraction there was Anthony Perkins. There was Mr. Perkins, the celebrated Norman Bates of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho among all the Trekkies and Doctor Who fans, etc. I think he looked on it as an opportunity to promote the succeeding Psycho films.

Tony Perkins was clearly ill at ease among the Sci-Fi crowd. People like the Star Trek cast members know what to expect at these gatherings and act accordingly. Perkins did not really know how to handle the banter, he was in my estimation a serious guy who must have thought he was in a freak show. I asked him about appearing in Friendly Persuasion with Gary Cooper and I told him that that was my favorite role he did. He looked grateful that someone knew he did something besides Norman Bates.

But for better or worse, Norman Bates became his career role and it's what we remember Anthony Perkins for. He does create an indelible impression on the screen with Alfred Hitchcock's direction as the shy mother fixated man running a flea bag motel in an area where a new super highway has taken all the potential business.

Psycho has a simple plot. Janet Leigh on an impulse embezzles $40,000 in cash from her employer and goes on the run. She winds up in the Bates motel run by Norman and his mother. Later on private detective Martin Balsam goes after her as well. And finally John Gavin as Leigh's boy friend and Vera Miles as her sister go looking for the both of them.

Simple enough, but Alfred Hitchcock creates a mood of terror and suspense that lingers long after you've seen the film. My favorite shot of the film is not Leigh's legendary shower stabbing, but of Martin Balsam being knocked down and falling down that flight of stairs and then being stabbed to death. The camera work showing Balsam falling backwards is the most terrifying part of Psycho.

Though Anthony Perkins did so many other good things, the average cinema fan will tell you 99 out of 100 times that Norman Bates is the role he remembers Perkins for. So Perkins went with the flow.

It was repetitious for him, but a treat for fans.
2006-10-18
Still Remarkable To This Day
What a fantastic movie! A visual stunner with great camera work, superb acting, a wonderful script, and one of the greatest scores of all time. The term "masterpiece" gets thrown around a lot today but in this instance the glove fits. Hitchcock pulled out all the stops for this one and made a horror movie that can still frighten an audience today. Anthony Perkins' performance is fascinatingly perfect as Norman Bates. The duality of his role must have been difficult to act with but he pulls it off beautifully.

The one qualm I have is a common one. The exposition scene towards the end where the psychologist practically spells out the movie for you as if the audience are idiots who haven't been paying attention at all. I guess at the time psychological thrillers were far less common and the 1960's audience needed an explanation as to why Norman would dress up like his mother, but today this scene sticks out like a sore thumb. Despite this, I still give this movie a 10/10 for an (almost) perfect hour and a half of cinema.
2017-04-30
One of the best movies ever made!
**Please excuse me for some spelling mistakes**

This is the BEST HORROR/THRILLER/SCARY MOVIE IN THE WORLD! I just love this movie! Since I am a true movielover I do not mind that it is in black and white at all. The actors were great and still today it is a bit creepy when the thievish Marion Crane chooses the wrong place to spend the night on (and the wrong shower, ha ha ha). Perkins is SO perfect as Norman Bates and the voice of mother really made me shiver. The movie is filled with classic lines that I won't forget even if I'll isolate myself for 20 years. For those who can't stand old movies, or are'nt any real movielovers this will be a sleeping pill. But for us with a good taste it will be a very good experience. Don't get me wrong, i mean ''The Blair Witch project'' for example is scarier than ''Psycho'' but ''Psycho'' is creepier and better than any other thriller!

Watch out for the remake from 1998, it really sucks!!!!!!

10 out of 10 OF COURSE!!!!!!!!
1999-10-24
Souled Out
What else can one write about a film that has been expounded by numerous film scholars? We all know about the famous shower scene, don't we? But there's so much more to "Psycho" than that. It works well as a psychological thriller but if one understands the psyche of "Psycho" it works remarkably as a horror movie (notwithstanding that we are immune to on-screen gore now).

There is a reason why director is considered to be the most important person in a movie. We have heard about the legend of Hitchcok - the great director. The same story could have been rendered to a derivative b-movie by an average director but Hitchcock took it to unforeseen greatness. He made a great use of Robert Blotch's book. Where else would you see a mainstream suspense-horror film put on the highest pedestal of cinema?

There's no emptiness in a Hitchcock film. Every scene has a purpose and underlying meaning. There could be a meta-movie on the relationship between two sisters, who we never see together on screen for the obvious reason. We get a hint of their possibly strained relationship at the end. But it's done very offhandedly, very skilfully by the master. The possibilities of analyses are endless.
2014-04-03
It was a dark and stormy night...
(((((SPOILERS))))

For most people, the most memorable scene in Alfred Hitchcock's PSYCHO, indeed it's most famous scene, is the shower sequence. It has been broken down and analyzed ad nauseam as an example of the fine art of editing. It is a great sequence, but to me the best scene in PSYCHO occurs just before that. Janet Leigh as Marion Crane, on the run from having committed a crime, sits in the parlor behind the Bates Motel's office and discusses nothing and everything with Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates, the motel's lonely proprietor. It is a chat between strangers who desperately need to talk to someone, anyone, but have no one to whom they can confide. It is a beautifully written and acted scene, which serves as the calm before the storm.

For all of its flashiness and sleight-of-hand gore, the shower sequence isn't nearly as effective at showing what a master filmmaker Hitchcock was. It is in the parlor scene that the entire narrative spins around; as the audience is prompted to switch their allegiance from Marion to Norman. Nothing really happens in the scene, other than two characters talking, but how things are said reveals as much as what is actually said. Here Marion comes to terms with her mistake and decides to pull herself out of her "private trap." Norman introduces us, indirectly, to Mother and wins our sympathy, which is vital to the way the rest of the film plays out. The scene very skillfully sets the mood of uneasiness that propels us into the upcoming murder, even as it suggests that Marion is achieving a sense of inner peace. Madness is revealed, danger is suggested, yet the audiences is coolly and cruelly lulled into an almost tranquil state. It is obvious something is coming, but not so soon.

Then the shower curtain is ripped aside and blood begins to splatter.

The measure of a film like PSYCHO is not how cleverly it fools you the first time, but how irrelevant its surprises are to enjoying it time after time. Indeed, compare it to Gus Van Sant's 1998 remake, or even Brian De Palma's 1980 semi-remake, DRESSED TO KILL, and the power of the film is obvious. Van Sant's version, though a scene for scene imitation is barely watchable even once, especially if you are already familiar with the plot; and while De Palma's homage is stylish and intriguing the first time around, its psychology and plot tricks don't stand up on repeated viewings. By contrast, Hitchcock's PSYCHO can be viewed repeatedly with full awareness and appreciation of knowing what is coming up next.

I think an element of Hitchcock's genius is apparent in that he doesn't treat his major plot twist as a just a gimmick. The entire first half of PSYCHO could have been treated as just a shaggy dog story, a prelude marking time until Norman Bates' story takes center stage. But Hitchcock realized that Janet Leigh's story had to be presented with all due gravity, otherwise the shift to Anthony Perkins' story wouldn't be nearly as effective. Neither Van Sant nor De Palma seemed to understand this, especially De Palma who treats the Angie Dickinson scenes in DRESSED with a cruel, condescending sense of humor. Hitchcock's PSYCHO works as a whole, but could very easily have been presented as two independent episodes of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents....." Marion Crane's story is not just a build up (though Hitchcock himself claimed that killing off his leading lady was all meant as a joke on the audience), but as a complete story unto itself, replete with the type of shocking twist ending that was the hallmark of Hitchcock's television anthology. Likewise, the Norman Bates half of PSYCHO, is a complete suspense tale in its own right. The shower scene is the bridge between the two stories, but it is the scene in the parlor that cements the two tales -- and the fates of the two protagonist.

And if you look at PSYCHO as two separate parts of a whole, then Marion's story is revealed to be the more complete of the two. Norman's story, while beautifully done, is essentially a mystery story; Sam, Lila and Arbogast are trying to solve a whodunit: what happened to Marion and the $40,000? The cleverness of Hitchcock and screenwriter Joseph Stefano is that they let us think we know the answer right off the bat, building to a conclusion where it is revealed how completely we have been fooled. In the end, we know little more than Lila and Sam. To some extent, this is the real gimmick of the film.

On the other hand, Marion's story allows Hitchcock to make so much out of so little. He creates tension, even though there is no tangible threat. Marion is on the run with stolen funds, but the theft hasn't even been discovered yet. All of the danger is strictly in her mind: What will happen when...? She is a smart woman who has done something very stupid, but proceeds even as her fears grow and grow. But cinematically the suspense is created out of mundane things: a policeman's face at the car window, rain and windshield wipers slashing across the screen, the glare of on coming headlights. Mix this with the haunting voice overs of accusing voices and Bernard Herrmann incredible musical violence and the effect is hypnotic. But these imagined dangers do not prepare Marian or the audience for the real dangers ahead.

And something has to be said for Janet Leigh. Always overshadowed by Anthony Perkins' iconic performance, Leigh never gets her due (though she was nominated for an Oscar, she lost to Shirley Jones in ELMER GANTRY). But she dominates the first half of the film with a vivid performance that is sexual, humorous and bittersweet. So much of her role depends on the subtlety of her facial expressions: her sad smile at pretending to believe Sam's excuses for not marrying her, her bemused glances at the flirtatious old millionaire, her self-satisfied smirks as she thinks about how people will react to discovering her crime, her mixture of concern and fear as she talks to Norman in the backroom parlor. Plus, she displays an attitude that is both smart and sexy. It is one of the great film performance.

It's easy to take PSYCHO for granted now; it has been imitated so many times in so many ways by far lesser talents. Indeed, it's one negative is that it inspired so may pale imitations, including its own three sequels and a very bad remake. Yet even so, PSYCHO remains a one and only original. And its iconic status can't be denied; it redefined the concepts of what a Hitchcock film was and what a horror film could be.
2004-06-13
📹 Psycho full movie HD download 1960 - Anthony Perkins, Vera Miles, John Gavin, Martin Balsam, John McIntire, Simon Oakland, Vaughn Taylor, Frank Albertson, Lurene Tuttle, Patricia Hitchcock, John Anderson, Mort Mills, Janet Leigh - USA. 📀
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