🎦 Memento full movie HD download (Christopher Nolan) - Crime, Drama, Thriller, Mystery. 🎬
Memento
Year:
2000
Country:
USA
Genre:
Crime, Drama, Thriller, Mystery
IMDB rating:
8.5
Director:
Christopher Nolan
Guy Pearce as Leonard
Carrie-Anne Moss as Natalie
Joe Pantoliano as Teddy Gammell
Russ Fega as Waiter
Jorja Fox as Leonard's Wife
Storyline: Memento chronicles two separate stories of Leonard, an ex-insurance investigator who can no longer build new memories, as he attempts to find the murderer of his wife, which is the last thing he remembers. One story line moves forward in time while the other tells the story backwards revealing more each time.
Type Resolution File Size Codec Bitrate Format
1080p 1916x816 px 13303 Mb h264 640 Kbps mkv Download
HQ DVD-rip 852x362 px 1345 Mb h.264 1500 Kbps flv Download
Reviews
One of my favorites-Excellent!!!
I was totally blown away by this movie. I think this is a total masterpiece. I wish I could have thought of something as ingenious as this. I recommend it to anyone that enjoys a good mystery, acting, editing, directing, plot. I can and have watched it over and over again. This should have won for best picture the year it came out. Go out and rent it. Go and watch it. Go out and buy it. you will not be disappointed. This movie is about a guy who loses his short term memory and tries to hunt down his wife's rapist and killer. I won't say anything else. It is a masterpiece, thought not perfect it probably should be about a 9.8 on the IMDb but I'll give it a 10 out of 10.
2007-08-02
Haunting narrative structure! Nothing more.
Memento is fairly ordinary. Nothing earth-shattering about it. The slight story boils down to a man being manipulated left and right because of his disability: short-term memory loss. The tattoo idea is hard to swallow and there's a big storyline goof in the film: during the B&W scenes, when Guy Pearce relates the story about a another couple, with the husband suffering from short term memory lost, I thought, "Now, what are the chances of having two men suffering from STML in one movie?" I thought about this during the first part of the movie and pretty much figured out that what was going to happen in the remainder of the film. Memento only has three main characters. So seeing the old couple in the B&W flashbacks dramatically reinforced the fact that few real people populated the landscape. And with the main character acting from a disability and revenge (when the main character of a story seeks revenge, it's always misguided revenge) the other two characters (natalie and the cop) manipulating Guy, well, there aren't that many likeable people around to care for. All of this could have been saved if the performances had been great but alas they're simply okay. Nothing spectacular.

There's very little emotional core to this movie, no gravity. The scenes occurred one right after the other, with none of them being more memorable than the next. Memento has a seamless blandness to it when riveting scenes and stylized action was in order. Hitchcock would have done so much more with this story: likeable or interesting characters, for starters. And loads of stylized filmmaking this film was in desperate need of.

But if there's one aspect where Memento succeeds is how it lingers in the mind. Its ultimate creation is that of a totally distorted world, and in the end, seems to be what the director wanted to achieve. You might not enjoy Memento while watching it. You might even find it trite and convoluted. But like its main character, you'll be left with fragments of images and distorted time frame weeks after you've seen it. Memento is much better when one thinks about it afterwards than while watching it.
2002-02-22
substantially unrealistic
Why didn't this idiot keep an organized journal instead of always shuffling for small pieces of paper and pictures in misc. unorganized places, not to mention different rooms, when he knew he wouldn't remember anything come tomorrow? There was no way he should have been/could have been on the street driving [not knowing where he came from or probably why he was going to point B] let alone seriously be carrying a gun trying to fulfil a vengeance correctly. I'm lucky he didn't point the gun at me. A boring story told in forward so it had to be told sloppily and in reverse as a last ditch effort to be "intellectually" interesting. Save your time on this one. And ya, ya, don't bother to tell me about the nuances of it being told in reverse it was just lackluster film.
2001-06-25
No substance
Very little substance in this movie, with the gimmick (very well done) of telling the story in non-continuous sequences and almost in reverse order. But it is a frustrating and non-rewarding movie that cheats the audience at every step: a fictitious illness, characters that do things more to startle the audience rather than for a realistic reason, and an ending that is way too predictable and really silly at the same time. Basically, if you told the movie in a normal fashion, it would show more holes than a certain cheese I am fond of.
2001-10-14
A cerebral puzzle without passion
Fragmented, disjointed, unsequential story and screenplay, is innovative and certainly attention-getting, but ultimately mutes the emotional impact of film. Too few moments when the viewers here could connect, possibly because you have to work so hard continuously to figure out what is going on. An intricate cerebral puzzle but without passion.
2002-08-04
overused plot + often abused style = best movie of the year
A man with no short term memory tries to solve a murder. The scenes in the movie are played in reverse. Sounds like yet another run of the mill comedy but in reality is one of the best suspense/dramas I've seen in years.

While some may claim showing the scenes in reverse is just an annoying trick to make a simple plot confusing and add a plethora of twists, I wholeheartedly disagree. Any good story teller knows it's not what you say, but how you say it.

By playing the scenes in reverse you experience the confusion Lenny undergoes throughout the film. Showing some of the scenes in chronological order (BTW, the use of B&W instead of color to make the time distinction was ingenious) creates suspense which builds as the two timelines converge. The somewhat rushed pace (compared to a written format) doesn't give you enough time to adequately analyze the events during the movie. This has two advantages: firstly you're going to talk about it after you leave the theater adding to experience immensely, and secondly you don't have time to think about what has happened (will happen) so you're experience better follows that of Lenny.

While many might find the movie rather confusing, it flows wonderfully for anyone familiar with writing styles that constantly jump around a timeline (e.g. Catch 22).
2001-05-07
Best Movie of 2001 (Thus Far)
Incredible, riveting and powerful. What else could I say? This movie has all of the qualities of classic film noir as well as the magnitude of an original, unique concept that has been tried and tired before but works here.

Guy Pearce has been underrated for years (just think back now to Priscilla and can you believe this is the same guy) and finally might get the recognition here that was at least well-deserved of him back for LA Confidential. Powerful perfomances, well developed story with suspensful buildup of what our main character pieces together little by little makes this a must see.

Easily in my top 100 of all time.
2001-05-15
Innovative narrative structure makes for a powerful viewing experience
FACT ONE: "Just because there are things I don't remember doesn't make my actions meaningless."

FACT TWO: "Your notes could be unreliable."

FACT THREE: "Memories can be distorted."

FACT FOUR: "But, even if you get your revenge, you won't remember it. You won't even know it's happened."

FACT FIVE: "I want time to pass, but it won't. How can I heal if I can't feel time?"

FACT SIX: "We all need mirrors to remind ourselves who we are."

When life becomes incomprehensible human beings tend to simplify things, revise memories, select facts that may or may not be representative of "the truth." We strive to make events as intelligible as possible but that act often has unintended consequences. Now, if you can capture this existential human reality on film in such a way as to allow the viewer to experience this struggle for understanding, for the placement of private aspirations into the context of the moment even as the primary character makes this same struggle, then you have connected our hearts and minds seamlessly with the film's lifeworld. That is a rarity indeed.

Such is Memento, a brilliantly conceived and executed work of art that has its audience literally at their wits end (just like the film's main character) trying to understand it all. The great debate of whether Teddy's version of the truth at the end is really "the truth" is symptomatic of director Christopher Nolan's purposeful craftsmanship. The very fact that we are as uncertain throughout most of the film as to the context of Leonard Shelby's actions as Leonard himself signifies that Nolan has succeeded in not just telling us Leonard's story put allowing us to know what it is like to *be* Leonard. This allows the film to work at a much deeper, almost subconscious, level scarcely achieved on film.

Guy Pierce, Carrie-Anne Moss and Joe Pantoliano all deliver terrific performances with some of the most original material I've seen in years. This film grabs your brain and won't let go. It twists and turns and – just when you think you've got things figured out – Nolan whips the rug out from under your feet. You are left totally involved and struggling with creating some sense of closure out of the infinite loop of the film's structure.

You can debate endlessly whether Teddy's final summary of events is the truth. You can argue both sides of whether Leonard killed his wife or invented Sammy Jankis out of thin air. In the end these are open questions. In the end there are no definitive answers. In fact, in the end ANY answer is plausible, just choose the one that sits best in your mind. Make that the truth. Because THAT is what this film is all about. It's about a man who can remember who he is but not what he has done and, to that extend, it is the prefect postmodern critique. We are often forced to act without sufficient information. The accelerating rush of our lives sends us headlong into our present without full consideration of where we've been. And on that level Memento provides a bold, compelling narrative that connects Leonard with every person. It is the mirror image of our divided selves.

No matter how much his audience might disagree with the film's conclusion, Nolan understands that - in the end - truth doesn't matter. It is what we choose to do with what we think is the truth that's important. And that can mean anything at all.
2002-07-09
Okay, what am I doing? Oh, I'm chasing that guy.
What I generally look for in a good movie is character development. If nothing changes in the characters' personalities, I have trouble enjoying the film, as it loses a certain sense of realism. One method of character development that I particularly enjoy is that of the "revealing" method, finding out more about a person's personality by being shown information. Many people mention The Usual Suspects when reviewing Memento and I can't help using it as well. This method of character development is used very well in that movie also, in the twist at the end. I felt that Leonard's character developed extremely well in that we were shown bits of his personality at a time and it was not until the end that we found out what he was truly all about. *Spoiler comment at end*

This film, with its memory-troubled main character, reminded me of a sub-plot in the Kurt Vonnegut novel, The Sirens of Titan, in which the main Character, Malachi Constant, must endure repetitive memory wipes, only knowing what is going on by re-reading a series of notes that he writes to himself.

I was going to mention something else about Memento, but I forgot it. Maybe I should have written myself a note.

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***Spoiler comment below***

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I really enjoyed the sequence of shots in which Leonard realizes that he's crazy and consciously decides to prolong his fictitious search by leaving himself a note that is, in effect, a lie. The idea of lying to oneself brings up entirely new issues of paranoia that I thoroughly dig.

Will have to count next time i see it, the number of times that Teddy tries to get the keys to Leonard's car. I think it may be as many as six.

small plot hole, the Jaguar's car alarm goes off when the window is shot, but the alarm had not been armed.

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***End Spoiler***

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2001-04-16
📹 Memento full movie HD download 2000 - Guy Pearce, Carrie-Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano, Mark Boone Junior, Russ Fega, Jorja Fox, Stephen Tobolowsky, Harriet Sansom Harris, Thomas Lennon, Callum Keith Rennie, Kimberly Campbell, Marianne Muellerleile, Larry Holden - USA. 📀
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