🎦 Fight Club full movie HD download (David Fincher) - Drama, Thriller, Mystery. 🎬
Fight Club
Year:
1999
Country:
USA, Germany
Genre:
Drama, Thriller, Mystery
IMDB rating:
8.9
Director:
David Fincher
Edward Norton as The Narrator
Brad Pitt as Tyler Durden
Helena Bonham Carter as Marla Singer
Meat Loaf as Robert 'Bob' Paulson
Zach Grenier as Richard Chesler
David Andrews as Thomas
George Maguire as Group Leader
Eugenie Bondurant as Weeping Woman
Christina Cabot as Group Leader
Christie Cronenweth as Airline Attendant
Tim De Zarn as Inspector Bird
Storyline: A ticking-time-bomb insomniac and a slippery soap salesman channel primal male aggression into a shocking new form of therapy. Their concept catches on, with underground "fight clubs" forming in every town, until an eccentric gets in the way and ignites an out-of-control spiral toward oblivion.
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HQ DVD-rip 852x356 px 1636 Mb h.264 1500 Kbps flv Download
Reviews
Life-changing Fight Club
I am, unfortunately, not one of the faithful Chuck Palahniuk readers who had read the book BEFORE they saw the movie. I, however, couldn't wait to read the book after seeing this film. I've read the book 5 times since and seen the movie more times than I can remember.

Simply put, this movie changed my life. Not just on a personal level (on which I will not comment here except to say I'm now a major Palahniuk fan) but also as a movie-watcher. I view movies differently after seeing this movie, because it broke down doors.

This movie is literally the first time I ever came upon something that, at first sight seemed incredibly stylish, sophisticated and entertaining. The plot lured you in before turning you upside down, the acting was nothing short of perfect (has there ever been a more memorable character than Brad Pitt as Tyler Durden?), the music, the screenplay (based on what is now my all-time favorite book), the lighting, the pacing, the everything! Virtually everything about this movie took my by surprise, save for one man.

David Fincher, director, was probably the only reason I went to see this movie in the first place. His work on 'Seven' and 'The Game' had me excited to see what he would do next, but I came to this movie expecting a stylish flick that offered a good plot and hopefully some good acting but what I got was so much, much more.

Honestly, how many times have you seen a movie that, with every viewing, gets even more complicated yet so simple that you can't help but laugh. Every time I watch this movie I notice something new about it, such is the depth of what is on the screen. Then there's the tiny issue of the story of Fight Club, penned by Chuck Palahniuk (who has one of the most fertile imaginations around. Don't believe me? Read 'Survivor' and weep!) the story is nothing short of incredible, a pure shock-value social commentary on the state of the world at the end of the century. You'll cry, you'll laugh, you'll do all the clichés but most importantly you'll identify with every single thing on the screen.

This movie rates as one of my all-time favorite movies and, simply put, if you haven't seen it yet then quit wasting your time OnLine and get to the nearest videostore!

5/5
2003-02-04
fighting, bullying can have a huge turn around
A strange soap salesman named Tyler Durden and soon finds himself living in his squalid house after his perfect apartment is destroyed. The two bored men form an underground club with strict rules and fight other men who are fed up with their mundane lives. Their perfect partnership frays when Marla, a fellow support group crasher, attracts Tyler's attention.She then tries to ruin the whole attraction by taking piece by piece. In the last fight, Tyler is being chocked out and has flashbacks of what he's been taught; he then wakes the dragon and terminates his opponent.
2017-11-06
Such a Classic
This film although quite a mental thriller sides with a sense of classical cinema. This movie falls between realism and an avant-garde. Many of the events taken play may have happened before as well as can happen in the future. The final scene does get a little extreme but theoretically an act of terrorism similar to that could occur. Due to the film being narrated by a character, there is more freedom for the story to be twisted around a bit. Everything can be twisted due to complexity of an unstable mind, leading to a more artistic stance.

The lighting in Fight Cub was minimal, casting shadows around every corner. Although the lighting set the mood for the movie, it was used realistically. Nothing was un-natural, some of which I have experienced myself. Turning off the power to the house while it rained created a sense of realism. I'm not saying everyone does that, but when it comes to living in a house that is falling apart and leaking, it is something that should be taken care of. The basement scenes were great when it came to the lighting, there was little to none. It lowered our senses, making it more difficult to track what is going one, and get lost in the pure violence that was going on between two people. One film that comes to mind, using light as an expression of feeling is Limitless. Every time the main character takes a performance enhancing drug, the lighting around the world changes. Everything is more vibrant and energizing and contrast was enhanced to give the viewer a chance to walk in the main character's shoes.

Now let's talk about the shots. Fight Club covers all of the classic types of shots, from static to full motion this film seams it all together flawlessly. Close up shots made the fights personal, giving the viewer a chance to be in the shoes of the narrator. Being this close, raises the heart rate, nothing matters but this fight. The viewer is forced to watch the violence and there is no chance of getting out, just like the narrator taking punches. Extreme long shots were used when setting the scene. Displaying the whole back of the bar and the parking lot took the minimized the violence. It gave the viewer a chance to watch it from afar. The fight is meaningless and the viewer is no longer attached to it. It doesn't affect anyone but Tyler and the Narrator. This distance adds a sense of humor to lighten the mood. When the random guys come out of the back of the bar, the viewer sees what any onlooker sees, a fight between two people over an important reason. This adds a sense of humor to lighten the mood. The viewer knows they are beating each other up for fun, but the other guys see it as a serious fight between two drunks that should be broken up.

The production design crew did a fantastic job creating the apartment for the narrator. Filing it up with furniture to make it look similar to an Ikea magazine. This is a major part for setting up the story, showing how materialistic the narrator is. Also a slight foreshadowing with the yin and yang table. As the narrator transforms, he becomes less materialistic, he loses a sense of what it's like to own nice things, and does not miss it. He even points out that after a month of no television, he almost forgot it existed. The costume design department did a nice job on the narrator's work attire. Starting off well dressed with a tie and clean pressed shirt and eventually changing to an unbuttoned coffee and blood stained shirt. I noticed Tyler's shirt at the end was very unusual looking. After doing some research I learned that the shirt he wore was covered in pornographic magazine covers. The rating association made sure to tone down the movie to receive its R rating, but they completely missed the nude images portrayed on the shirt. That shirt really resembled what Tyler stood for.
2017-09-28
Fincher's half
I sat through the first half of this movie with my mouth open. It was so exciting, brilliant, a Fritz Lang for the new millennium. Edward Norton's face. That insomnia that he carries all over him is so magnificently drawn that creates the opposite effect on its audience. I was awake, very awake, sitting on the edge of my seat, devouring every moment, enjoying it like hell. Helena Bonham Carter was a like a great silent movie star doing her first talkie. Pola Negri, Theda Bara. As if this wan't enough, Brad Pitt, and Brad Pitt is Brad Pitt with all its fabulous connotations. Then, can you explain to me why I detested this movie? Why it made me so angry? Can you? I can only tell you that half way through I turned against the movie or the movie turned against me, either way I didn't like it. I felt cheated in the worse possible way. I felt treated like a moron. You start promising me the most unique film experience I've had in a long time but what you delivered was a tired, opportunistic, gimmicky, easy piece of nonsense. Why? David Fincher is one of the most consummated craftsmen American movies have ever had. Don't you agree? He can tell you a story, even something like "Seven", a horror thriller, in a way we've never seen before, at least half of it. He has an eye like no other. That's why my frustration. An artist like that putting himself at the service of something that's not done, not finished not worthy of his talents. You may think I'm being a bit too hard on the man. But let me tell you, it's out of love. I expect so much from him, I've seen what he is capable of. But so far have been only halves. Brilliantly acted, sensational to look at, but halves, just halves. He should look at Fritz Lang, Pietro Germi, Alfred Hitchcock, Michael Powell, William Wellman and naturally John Ford, Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg. Fincher already inherited something from each one of them. Now the trick is that it isn't a trick. Half is better than nothing. But in the grand scheme of things, it's not enough.
2005-02-06
Fight Club Review
Do you really know when one situation ends and another begins? Are there gaps in your memory, where for some reason, you can't remember how you got somewhere? No? Well this is the case for the unnamed narrator in Fight Club. Looking for change, a depressed insomniac living a gray boring life is looking for relief; relief from the humdrum grind of his life. This leads into the emotion of the movie. Darkness shrouds the film at every corner. Seemingly to represent the crushing weight of uselessness the narrator feels towards his life. The darkness that encompasses nearly every scene almost allows the viewer to feel the weight and pressure of the narrators life. A justification for using this type of lighting may be because of how the story was being told. Narration occurred solely by the unnamed narrator, the main character. The audience is only allowed to see the story through his perspective. This leads into time gaps that occur in the film. Since the audience can only see the story from his perspective, the audience is limited to the knowledge that he has. For example, Tyler Durden, his alter-ego remains as a separate person throughout most of the movie. Time-gaps are also evident This limitation of perspective allows the narrator to shape what the audience thinks of him. Towards the end of the movie, the audience gets a glimpse of reality through the cameras in the parking garage. There are many situations within Fight Club that try to clue the audience into the fact that Tyler Durden and the narrator are actually the same person. These become much more evident towards the end of Fight Club. Tyler tells the narrator not to talk to anyone about him. This is an attempt to prevent others from revealing who Tyler Durden really is. It's actually a very intelligent way to partition his mind like this. However, the narrator himself realizes something is wrong very early in the movie. At one points he attempts to consult a professional asking him if he could die from insomnia or narcolepsy which involves appearing in places but can't remember how you got there. This scene shows directly that the narrator is experiencing this and is worried. If the narrator had gotten professional help and was prescribed medicine to treat his neurological illness, the acts of terrorism at the end of the movie might not have ever happened. A possible suggestion towards the narrators neurological illness was the beginning animation. During the starting credits, a brain and neurons with electrical impulses is shown at the beginning of Fight Club. This could have hinted towards the neurological illnesses that the narrator has and will face. The movie also used camera angles to help the audience experience what the characters in the movie were feeling. During the fight scenes, a lot of the time there was a bottom up view of the fight5ers. This happened especially when the narrator want barbaric on the blond man and beat him until he had sustained heavy injuries. This was to show the audience the position that the blond man was in, showing the true ferocity of the narrator. However, this isn't always the case. Other times throughout the movie camera angles seemed pretty neutral or just moved with the flow of the characters to provide a fluid viewing experience for the audience. During the end of the movie, the camera shot was used to show the vastness of the city being dismantled by Tyler's destruction. Fight Club also includes those strange up close and free moving, almost untethered shots where scenarios are shown such as when the narrators apartment is blown up or the 10 bombs that are scattered around the city. All of these shots together in one movie give the audience a unique perspective.
2017-09-28
Fincher's best film along with Se7en
"The first rule of Fight Club is you do not talk about Fight Club"

I will go ahead and break the rule and simply talk about Fight Club; the 1999 film that I recently added to my favorite movie list. In my opinion this is one of Fincher's masterpieces along with Se7en. David Fincher has made some great films, but none have ever rivaled his work in the 90's with these two films. Both Se7en and Fight Club are among my favorite films and consider them superior to Fincher's other great recent films like Zodiac, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, The Social Network, and The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. Fight Club is an extremely violent film, but I don't think it's gratuitous because the movie really works as a satire and raises several philosophical questions about how enslaved we've become under the capitalist and advertising system, but it also points out the danger of anarchy as well. We've become materialist beings finding our purpose in our possessions and have left out the spiritual part. Sometimes we need to feel pain to remind ourselves that we are alive, and in a way this film works as a highly crafted metaphor. I loved the way the story was presented and how this surrealistic film worked. Based on Chuck Palahniuk's novel of the same name, and adapted for the screen by Jim Uhls, Fight Club is a masterpiece thanks to Fincher's direction and the performance from the excellent cast which includes Edward Norton, Brad Pitt, and Helen Bonham Carter. I really loved this movie from beginning to end, including the twist in the final act. 1999 was the year of great twists considering this is when The Sixth Sense was released as well (my all time favorite film). Fight Club is a must see film for all.

The movie begins with a scene where the narrator (Edward Norton) has a gun forced down his throat by Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt), to which the narrator begins to tell the viewer what has led him to this point through voice over narration, and so the film is told in flashback. He takes us back to the days when he was an office worker who experienced severe insomniac problems. The doctor recommended that he visit a support group with men who have suffered from testicular cancer in order for him to really see the pain other people have gone through. Despite not suffering from this condition, the narrator decides to do so and discovers that going to these therapies allows him to finally being able to sleep for the first time in months. After this, he decides to attend a different support group every night and everything seems to go well, until he discovers a manic depressive woman named Marla Singer (Helena Bonham Carter) who is doing the same thing he's been doing: jumping from one support group to another. Seeing her as an intruder and a liar, the narrator can no longer find peace in the support groups and so his insomniac problems begin again. His life will change dramatically when he meets Tyler Durden, a soap maker, in an airplane and has an interesting conversation with him. They exchange numbers and when the narrator arrives home from the airport he discovers his condo has been blown up. He then decides to call Tyler and ends up moving in with him at an old abandoned complex. The two start a very different support group which they call Fight Club since they have to fight one another. The movement becomes popular and little by little they begin to form a revolutionary movement known as Project Mayhem, but things begin to escalate too fast and dangerously.

Edward Norton appeared in the big movie screen during the 90's and this was when he made his best films (American History X, Primal Fear, The People vs. Larry Flynt, Rounders, and Fight Club), although I would have to argue that his best performances were in American History X and The 25th Hour. However he is still excellent in this film as well. Brad Pitt is at his best playing the sort of chaotic and anarchic character who in some ways is similar to the narrator, but in others very different and more dangerous. He has a strong pull on Norton's character and influences him deeply. Helena Bonham Carter also plays one of her best roles as this sort of manic-depressive character who stands her own ground in this mostly male dominated film. The performance from the cast is one of the best things about Fight Club which works in every level. The visuals and special effects are also fantastic. It is a dark film with a lot of violence mixed with satire that had me laughing quite a bit. I absolutely loved this movie and the ending was just brilliant.

http://estebueno10.blogspot.com
2012-06-29
In Tyler we trust
"...Advertising has us chasing cars and clothes, working jobs we hate so we can buy things we don't need. We're the middle children of history, man. No purpose or place. We have no Great War. No Great Depression. Our Great War's a spiritual war... our Great Depression is our lives. We've all been raised on television to believe that one day we'd all be millionaires, and movie gods, and rock stars. But we won't. And we're slowly learning that fact. And we're very, very.........." David Fincher has created a masterpiece based on Chuck Palahniuk's novel.This movie photographs our entire generation,analyzing the dead- ends of our society.The narrator(Edward Norton) has become a person who basically has everything,but nothing.Subconsciously,he tries to find an alternative way to go on with his life but this is not possible cause he has already a wrong perspective.Therefore,he invents Tyler's character as a defensive mechanism.Nobody can realize that they are the same person,until the story shows who Tyler really is and the plot follows a different direction.A great thing about this movie is that Fincher keeps a neutral perspective as the movie ends concerning what is right or wrong.Bombing large buildings is a solution to our society's economic problems?Inventing an alter-ego character is a solution for everybody's personal issues?Creating a fight club is really a way to solve your daily problems?It's up to everyone to make his/her own conclusions at the end of the movie.The director does not preach,he just presents both sides of the same coin. I have read that Brad Pitt has become the only choice for Tyler.I totally agree.This movie would be different with another actor playing this character.It's a brilliant performance.I also think that it wouldn't be among the 10 best movies,if the director was a different one.David Fincher has this ability to deeply analyze a situation and all movie characters.All scenes have his own perspective and the plot never reveals the double character.Norton also gives a unique performance and becomes completely his character which is quite difficult considering that he grows a psychotic behavior. In general,fight club is definitely one of the best movies ever made.It demands more than one viewing in order to be understood completely,but after that it creates lot of discussion.A real masterpiece.
2010-06-29
perfect
It keeps topping its own giddy excesses. Adapted by Jim Uhls from Chuck Palahniuk's novel, this has something--but only something--to do with a bored Edward Norton encountering a nihilistic doppelganger (Brad Pitt) who teaches him that getting your brains bashed out is fun. Though you're barely allowed to disagree with him, your jaw is supposed to drop with admiring disbelief at the provocation, and the overall impression of complexity might easily be mistaken for the genuine article. In other words, this is American self-absorption at its finest. With Helena Bonham Carter, Meat Loaf, and Jared Leto.
2017-10-20
Flashback Humor
(Spoilers herein) Films like this frustrate. This is so competent, so engaging that I curse it for wasting the chance to say something memorable, or important or perhaps both.

What's good is the way that they've solved the `narrator problem.' here, the narrator has imagined the hero (we find out), which is rather clever. We become cocreater of the hero because the narrator has cast the whole film as a conversation with us to explain the last scene which we see in flashback at the beginning of the film. Along the way, we are reminded that we are messing with the film, and the film with us. This latter goes so far as to have the hero work as a projectionist, explaining cigarette burns. He inserts subliminal pornography, which we see throughout with a longer, more noticeable flash toward the end. When we find out about Pitt's non-existence, it is underscored by images on `video.' Add to that the inherently cinematic nature of voyeuristic personal violence, and this film has us captured.

When we return to the last scene, Pitt tells us that the whole thing is `flashback humor,' the most strongly selfreferential trick I know in film. Obviously, the self-referential notion of narrator is the reason for this film. That's why Ed Norton bought the film rights to `Motherless Brooklyn,' which exploits a similar experiment in the narrative mystery. In that case, the narrator has Tourette's.

So the film competently captures us, and then what? A wasted opportunity. My major complaint is that this film meant nothing, imparted nothing, only thumbed its nose as if to say: I can capture you as easily as the doofuses in the story and for just as capricious a reason. We deserve better. You with talent should do better.

Lesser complaints:

Norton and Pitt are excellent, though Pitt has much the simpler requirement. Why waste Helena Bonham Carter? She's got the moxie; she's been memorable before. I think the director just didn't know how to use her beyond a vapid sullenness. Another wasted opportunity.

Narrative tricks like this are best when they follow the detective story `play-fair' model. This is what `The Sixth Sense' does. On a second viewing of that film, everything works, but with new information. More, some minor problems become clearer. Not so with this film. The writers have played too fast and loose with motivations. It is rather in the `oh, that was a dream' or the `oh, time travel reversed that' category. And it could have been tidier in this regard without messing anything up.

Most every scene was weird (a good) because it ran against short-term expectations. But the scene where Lou and thug visit the fight club is pure stereotype, and predictable. Why?

I wish the last scene were more, more something. This is where it really begins to hit you that the whole thing was motivated by an illusion, with as much effect.

Bottom line: this film is so good, and its makers so talented that should be held to higher standards. I give it a 9 for competence. You should see it for that reason. But it has no purpose.
2000-06-24
Not what I expected. One of the best movies ever made.
I had avoided this movie as I had assumed it was 'Rocky Goes Underground'. Saw it last night (May 2013) only because my son wanted to watch it and I was too tired to get off the couch. I was totally blown away. It has no resemblance to Rocky or any other boring boxing movie.

Can't stop thinking about it today, certainly can't concentrate on work. Why? Because I totally identify with The Narrator and it seems from the comments here and from the consensus of viewer ratings that I am far from alone. Its not 'Macho Porn', or 'little-boy posturing' as Roger Ebert describes it. It is rather one of the most thought provoking movies I have ever seen.

I unleashed my own Tyler Durden 10 years ago, not violently or illegally, but I did turn my back on my serf-like existence as a well- paid corporate slave. Sure it was painful and chaotic. But my marriage survived and now I run my own small business. Sometimes I think I made a mistake, as my former affluent life sure was easier. But it takes a movie like this to remind me how empty it was and how much more satisfying it is to take the road less travelled, to forge my own destiny, to have a proper work life balance that allows me to know my kids and to not be sucked into hollow consumerism.
2013-05-17
📹 Fight Club full movie HD download 1999 - Edward Norton, Brad Pitt, Helena Bonham Carter, Meat Loaf, Zach Grenier, Richmond Arquette, David Andrews, George Maguire, Eugenie Bondurant, Christina Cabot, Sydney 'Big Dawg' Colston, Rachel Singer, Christie Cronenweth, Tim De Zarn, Ezra Buzzington - USA, Germany. 📀
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