🎦 Chinatown full movie HD download (Roman Polanski) - Crime, Drama, Thriller, Mystery. 🎬
Chinatown
Year:
1974
Country:
USA
Genre:
Crime, Drama, Thriller, Mystery
IMDB rating:
8.3
Director:
Roman Polanski
Jack Nicholson as J.J. Gittes
Faye Dunaway as Evelyn Mulwray
John Huston as Noah Cross
Perry Lopez as Escobar
John Hillerman as Yelburton
Darrell Zwerling as Hollis Mulwray
Diane Ladd as Ida Sessions
Roy Jenson as Mulvihill
Roman Polanski as Man with Knife
Richard Bakalyan as Loach (as Dick Bakalyan)
Joe Mantell as Walsh
Bruce Glover as Duffy
Nandu Hinds as Sophie
James O'Rear as Lawyer
Storyline: JJ 'Jake' Gittes is a private detective who seems to specialize in matrimonial cases. He is hired by Evelyn Mulwray when she suspects her husband Hollis, builder of the city's water supply system, of having an affair. Gittes does what he does best and photographs him with a young girl but in the ensuing scandal, it seems he was hired by an impersonator and not the real Mrs. Mulwray. When Mr. Mulwray is found dead, Jake is plunged into a complex web of deceit involving murder, incest and municipal corruption all related to the city's water supply.
Type Resolution File Size Codec Bitrate Format
1080p 1920x816 px 8136 Mb h264 640 Kbps mkv Download
DVD-rip 640x272 px 1382 Mb mpeg4 448 Kbps mkv Download
Reviews
First-rate detective drama
'Chinatown' is one of the best films of the 70s and without doubt one of the most memorable in the crime/detective genre. This is a first- rate picture all round with very few faults, if any. The story is complex but relatively easy to follow, which I prefer to films that are too smart for their own good. It's an intelligent mystery that captures your attention from the start and has no problem in holding it for the duration of the film.

Part of what makes 'Chinatown' so memorable is just how perfect it is in appearance. The cinematography is on another level to anything else I've seen from the 70s - each and every scene is crafted in such a stylish and elegant way. The script is also brilliant and gives us some classic lines, including of course the famous last line of the film, 'Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown'. 'Chinatown' is a film that lives up to its glowing reputation. It's difficult to fault this detective gem.
2017-08-23
One of the best noir thriller ever
I watched this movie recently for the first time and I'm 26 (I know, shame on me). I didn't know anything about it and didn't even read the cover of the DVD, so it came as a surprise to me. Well, it's an amazing thriller with very good acting all along. First of all, Jack Nicholson portraits a great character, very different from the types we got used to see him playing later on. John Houston is also very believable in a role that could have easily turned into a stereotype. The LA setting in the '30s is very suggestive, and Polanski's direction follows the story with a objective eye that suits the film perfectly. I recommend this masterpiece to anyone who likes good cinema.
2009-03-03
noir.
Polanksi's 'Chinatown' stands as one of the classics of 1970s American cinema, the last classic period in American cinema. It's a great reminder of how utterly engaging cinema can be without the special effects, flimsy plots and outrageous stunts of many major studio productions now, not evening mentioning the obvious marketing tie-ins.

The cinematography and screenplay could be considered almost economical in its minimalism as it is really the story, script and characters that drive this movie forward.

Chinatown tells the story a detective, confidently played by Jack Nicholson, who gets embroiled in an investigation involving the mysterious murder (suicide?) of the head of the Water Board. During the investigation, he gets involved with Evelyn Mulwray, the wife of the murdered man who appears to want to get to the bottom of the mystery but during the course of the movie demonstrates that she is not telling the whole story and has something to hide.

Everything in this movie works from already mentioned tight editing down to the costumes and sets.

Nuff said!

10/10
2004-10-03
A private detective who moved from Chinatown because of superstitions to L.A. gets caught up in twisted family, and what at the start was a small investigation turns out to be a big investigation, with setup
I give this movie a 10 because it thrilled me like hell, there's great writing in the script, great camera shots, outstanding acting, and kept you thinking through out the movie, what will happen next, or maybe this will happen.
2003-01-21
One of the top 100 films of all time
The year 1974 was very memorable. That year several films were successes which consisted of Francis Coppula's "The Godfather:Part II",Alan Pakula's political thriller "The Parallex View",Robert Aldrich's "The Longest Yard",and not to mention the disaster epics of the day;Irwin Allen's "The Towering Inferno",and Mark Robson's "Earthquake" not to mention the films "The Conversation",and "The Great Gatsby","Lenny",and "Blazing Saddles" to name a few. But one film in particular stood out from all the rest and it shows why that was one of AFI's 100 top films of all time.

The year was 1974. The motion picture is "Chinatown". This was the movie that cemented Jack Nicholson as a bonafide superstar throughout the entire decade of the 1970's. This was the movie that started it all.

Jack Nicholson graduated from star to superstar playing a gumshoe in this marvelously intricate film noir of the 70's directed by Roman Polanski,who has a memorable cameo as a sadistic hood,gives Nicholson the most famous nose job in motion picture history. Robert Towne's Oscar winning script(whom they used in some acting and writing classes as a learning tool in some colleges)brilliantly depicts 1940's Los Angeles as a glittering cesspool of murder,incest,and corrupt land deals. Faye Dunaway steals the picture with a haunting performance as the film's alluring female fatale,and John Huston,as her creepy millionaire father,will make your skin crawl. The stunning finale still packs an emotional wallop. "Chinatown" was the apex of what the cinema of the 1970's was about to become,and this was the prime factor of that as well.

The film was nominated for 11 Oscars including Best Picture and won three for Best Original Score(Jerry Goldsmith),Best Screenplay(Robert Towne),and Best Supporting Actor(John Huston).
2002-08-06
Yes, this really is the best movie ever...
From the first 10 minutes of the first time I saw this movie in the theatre, I've truly loved it, more any other movie I've ever seen. Why? Well, that easy, it's just so... PERFECT!

Obviously there are many other great movies, and many other movies I personally also love, but Chinatown has a real spell over me. Other fans have commented here on the story and the spellbinding way that the forlorn and utterly mysterious story unfolds. I certainly agree.

Chinatown's cinematography and editing? Yes, I agree again! IMO, it's breathtaking, with pacing so tight that I sit straight up thru the whole movie and my nerves become completely raw every time I watch, listen and FEEL it again.

I don't think anybody has commented yet on the great choice of the many supporting actors. Each one so well cast and very believable in their roles! You've got the entire cast credits list (thank you IMDb) so I won't list them here but there are so many memorable performances here! It would be unfair to highlight one, two or three! Good cops, bad cops, ugly rich, up-and-coming, downtrodden poor, the very honest and very crooked with all shades in between! Each and every role a character study in and of itself and together they make a living "time capsule" of the forties that we can revisit for generations to come.

And then there's that sound track which hooked me on great trumpet players and the Est Coast Jazz sound of the era. I just love that music and way it interweaves with the ongoing theme - it's perfectly united with the faithful and compelling use of the film-noir style.

I saw this movie first in Chicago and heck, back then I knew nothing about LA, though I've since moved to and lived in the area for years. Once relocated, I quickly discovered the historically interesting side to the story and then appreciated the movie from yet another compelling angle. No question, the plot is fundamentally sound with many totally unexpected and yet quite plausible turns. But I later understood that it's within the realm of believability from factual standpoint, as well as intellectually/emotionally.

Geez, I'll never forget that first confrontational scene at the Albacore Club! The study in absolute raw and evil power as masterly portrayed by John Huston. In the very same scene Jack Nicholson skillfully paints the subtleties of his cautious, cynical, small-time hustler character. The air crackles! I must have played this scene in my mind a thousand times. When I visited Catalina Island for the first time in about 1985, not knowing its significance to the movie, I walked by the Albacore Club (The Tuna Club in real life) and froze transfixed. I recognized it instantly of course, and I must have stood there gawking for 20 minutes not saying a word. I could literally HEAR the Chinatown theme - the memories were that clear and fresh!

In closing, I guess then what does it about Chinatown for me (why I feel so strongly that it is the very best movie of all) is that every facet of the movie construction, from the opening scene to the ending credits, somehow fits together in a homogeneous, complete and absolutely flawless way.

I find it fascinating to analyze the characters and their makeup. To imagine the reasons they did what they did. But there is NOTHING I would change. Nothing.
2004-06-28
As coolly intense and exceptionally-staged as any detective story/film-noir of the 40's & 50's
Chinatown is a tremendous collaborative effort that produced one of the most memorable Hollywood pictures of the 1970's. Director Roman Polanski (his last film in America, and the first he made in America after the murder of Sharon Tate), stars Jack Nicholson & Faye Dunaway, and writer Robert Towne, all come together to create a detective story classic. At times it slows its pace down so the viewer can think along with Nicholson's character, to take in the environment as well as the situation he's in (i.e. when he goes to the empty reservoir, when he visits Noah Crosses house the first time). And the script has the perfect sense of drawing us into a story, fueled by curiosity, grit, and cynicism, and engages the viewer by its realistic dialog between the characters.

J.J. Gittes (Nicholson, in one of his best 70's performances) is in Los Angeles circa 1933 in the line of private investigator, usually dealing with people who may or may not believe that their significant other is having an affair. Evelyn Mulwray feels this may be the case with her husband Hollis, and Gittes decides to take the case. However, this draws him into a deeper case involving the city's loss of water once Hollis- a major player in the water supply controversy in the city- is found murdered. This eventually leads him to Noah Cross (John Huston), a big businessman and who also happens to be Evelyn's father. Intrigue starts to develop, as Jake's own life begins to be at risk.

As a intricate, detailed detective story the film is an above-average work, with Towne's script containing the maturity, and wicked sense of humor, of a James M. Cain or Raymond Chandler novel. When the thrills come they come as being striking. And when humanity and compassion get thrown into the mix, the film reaches a whole other plane of intelligence. The last third of the film could turn off some of the audience (depending on one's own level of belief), but it holds strong thanks to the performances. Nicholson doesn't over-step his bounds in any scene, finding the right notes in suggestive conversations. Dunaway is better than expected (though I'm not sure if it's an great performance). And Huston's Noah Cross is one of the more disturbing villains of that period in movies. Add to it some good cameos (Burt Young as a driver, Polanski playing the little guy in the infamous 'knife' scene), and a smooth soundtrack by Jerry Goldsmith, Chinatown comes out as strong piece of movie-making, and arguably one of the greatest in the crime/mystery genre.
2003-12-17
He nose you know!
Chinatown is directed by Roman Polanski and written by Robert Towne. It stars Jack Nicholson, Faye Dunaway, John Huston, Perry Lopez and John Hillerman. Music is by Jerry Goldsmith and cinematography by John A. Alonzo.

Private investigator J.J. Gittes (Nicholson) is working on an adultery case but quickly finds himself embroiled in murder and corruption.

The gathering of Polanski, Towne, Nicholson and Robert Evans (producer) put their respective skills together to craft one of the most lauded neo-noir films of all time. It's a searing picture awash with the staples of the film noir and gumshoe detective movies that graced cinema in the 40s and 50s. From the characterisations (suspicious femmes - mouthy coppers - sleazy kingpin - tough protagonist in a whirlpool of unravelling layers), to the hard boiled script, violence, sex and brutal revelations, it's a noir essential that only lacks chiaroscuro and expressionistic swirls to seal the complete deal.

Allegoraries unbound, iconography assured and dialogue now in the lexicon of legends, Chinatown is not to be missed, not just by fans of noir, but fans of cinema, period. 9.5/10
2015-09-24
A Bit Confusing But Always Fascinating
No sense going into a detailed review describing what this film is about because there are enough reviews already. I'll just say it took me several viewings to finally figure out what was going on. It's not an easy to story to follow. It's also unusual: a crime story dealing with rights to water. To many people, that's odd but water has always been a precious commodity in southern California.

There is nothing confusing about how this film looks. It's a treat for one's eyes, especially if you love that 1940s look, which I do. This movie just drips with Los Angeles film noir atmosphere: a rich-looking piece of cinema with great period detail.

What stands out in most people's memory of this film is another odd thing: a man's nose getting sliced. Here, it's Jack Nicholson getting a "nose job" courtesy of some thugs. Jack, playing "Jake Gittes," will forever be known (among wild roles) as the guy with a bandage on his nose, thanks to this movie. As interesting as he is, along with Faye Dunaway and the rest of the cast, I always get a kick out of seeing John Huston in here. I love the way he sounds and acts, and I'm sorry he had such a short role.

Overall, an always-fascinating film no matter how many times you watch it or how well you understand it.
2006-04-03
Jack and kill
I have to confess I absolutely hate Jack Nicholson as an actor. Everyone has their bête- noire I suppose and he's mine, I just see him overacting in everything instead of acting. That goes for "One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest", "The Shining", "The Departed", you name it, for me he ruins it. All that is, except this.

In Roman Polanski's superb revision of the 40's 'tec thriller, Nicholson is, and I really hate to say it, believe me, nothing short of brilliant. His character is a workaday private investigator, small-fry, but smart and persistent and Nicholson has you following in Jake Gittes every step from the first, which of course is director Polanski's methodology here, to draw in the viewer and hand us the problem, almost at first-hand, of trying to solve the labyrinthine plot, which gets deeper and darker as it progresses.

Of course there has to be a femme fatale and here Faye Dunaway is entrusted the Mary Astor/Lauren Bacall role. However I wasn't completely convinced by her, for me she lacked the sexy allure and depths of mystery the part demands. Thus it was that at the famous expository "Mother! Sister!" scene, I almost burst out laughing at the fake sincerity (or should that be sincere fakery?) she employs. It was John Huston who got the acting Oscar in the movie, well deserved for his sleazy portrayal of the monstrous megalomaniacal father to Dunaway.

Polanski's stylish direction is pace-perfect, unhurriedly but assuredly unfolding and then folding in again the action. The cinematography and depiction of the age couldn't be more accurate at least to these eyes and ears while the rhythmic vernacular of the dialogue is a pleasure to hear. By the time the movie reaches its bloody, tragic, but inevitable climax, you feel like one of the bystanders shooed away by the police at the end, so close have you been to the action.

At one point Gittes asks the question "How do you like them apples?" I liked them fine, just fine.
2012-12-01
See Also
📹 Chinatown full movie HD download 1974 - Jack Nicholson, Faye Dunaway, John Huston, Perry Lopez, John Hillerman, Darrell Zwerling, Diane Ladd, Roy Jenson, Roman Polanski, Richard Bakalyan, Joe Mantell, Bruce Glover, Nandu Hinds, James O'Rear, James Hong - USA. 📀
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